Sports

How to succeed as a student-athlete: 12 simple tips


Last week, I lectured to approximately one hundred student-athletes and coaches at The Leadership Program at The University Of Delaware.

This is a wonderful institution with a great sense of community. I have been a university professor at two institutions and I have visited many college campuses over the years, and I was delighted to see that this university encouraged a climate of closeness and camaraderie among it student-athletes.

I might add that the students and the support staff could not have been more polite and more accommodating than they were during my visit to this campus.

Attendees at this seminar included members of the lacrosse team, the tennis team, the golf team, the dance team, the track team, the basketball team and the softball team.

Participants were introduced to techniques for developing confidence, focus and relaxation when the pressure is on. I also introduced the group to the world of sport psychology, mental toughness, hypnosis and peak performance.

My visit to this university also caused me to reflect on some of things student-athletes need to be aware of in order to choose the right institution and in order to have a successful athletic and academic experience.

 

  1. Choose a university which is right for you. Consider the size of the school, the distance from home, the scholarship package, the financial value, the majors offered, the internships available, the climate and the quality of the academic programs and the sports programs.

 

  1. Get a good sense of the school's expectations and goals where you and your team are concerned.

 

  1. Pay close attention to how you and your parents feel about the coach. In short, you want a coach who is a fine person and who has a great deal of knowledge and skill about your sport.

 

  1. Get to know your potential teammates. Your relationships with them have a lot to do with how things will go for you at the institution you are considering attending.

 

  1. Develop a list of questions which address all of your concerns and ask coaches, administrators, professors and your fellow students to respond to these concerns.

 

One very important question is, "What is about me that wants the university to have me attend this institution?"

 

  1. Talk to current athletes and to athletes who have graduated from the institution. Assess the quality of the relationships they have and have had with the people who you will be interacting with on a regular basis for the next four years.

 

  1. Find out about the amount of time you will need to spend in practice, training and studying during your stay at the university. Balancing academics and sports can be a real challenge for many students.

 

  1. Find out what kind of training you are required to do in the off season.

 

  1. Don't jump at your first offer. This is an important decision, so be patient and thorough as you go through the process. Visit a minimum of three or four schools before you make your final decision.

 

 

  1. Going off to college can be a huge adjustment for athletes and for non-athletes. There are many challenges: managing time, managing money, sharing a room, adjusting to larger classes, living away from home, joining a fraternity or sorority, and managing social distractions are all part of getting used to this phase of your life.

 

  1. This is a special time of your life. Try to find a mindset that allows you to learn, grow, explore, develop friendships and have an enjoyable experience.

 

  1. Competing on the college level can be quite challenging. Some student-athletes feel like stars in high school, but feel less important and less prepared when they compete at the college or university level. You may benefit from some training in sport psychology so that you can better master the mental aspects of your sport.

 

Jay P. Granat, Ph.D. is a Psychotherapist, Author and The Founder of http://www.StayInTheZone.com. Dr. Granat has appeared in many major media outlets including The New York Times, Good Morning America, ESPN, The Wall Street Journal, The BBC and The CBC. He has developed many self-help programs including How To Get Into Zone And Stay In The Zone With Sport Psychology And Self-Hypnosis and Bedtime Stories For Young Athletes. These programs are available at http://www.StayInTheZone.com. Dr. Granat is available for seminars and for private coaching and he can be reached at 888 580-ZONE or at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

   

BCS Championship tonight -- who do you got??


Florida State goes for third national title in BCS Championship game tonight.  Follow our hosts Ferrari and Sheana around their campus right here!

Auburn University tries to finish their miracle season with a big upset. Take a college video tour with our hosts Nicole and Sheana right here!
   

Palm Beach County selected as the host for the NCAA Women’s Soccer National Championship


Florida Atlantic University (FAU) and the Palm Beach County Sports Commission have been selected to host the NCAA Division I Women’s Soccer National Championship, known as the Women’s College Cup. The National Championship, scheduled for December 5-7, 2014, will take place at FAU Stadium in Boca Raton.  The Women’s College Cup includes the semifinals and championship rounds, culminating the NCAA tournament featuring a field of 64 teams.   

FAU was one of 11 universities announced as a finalist by the NCAA selection committee in October. The Committee then conducted site visits to verify that all locations were suitable to host the event. This event will mark the first time that an NCAA Division I National Champion will be crowned in Palm Beach County.  “On behalf of Florida Atlantic University, we are honored to serve as hosts for the 2014 NCAA Women’s College Cup,” said Pat Chun, FAU’s Director of Athletics. “We thank the Palm Beach County Sports Commission on being great partners. The country is well aware of the great sports destination we have become. This will be yet another opportunity to showcase our wonderful campus and beautiful community.”

FAU Stadium is one of the premier sports venues in Palm Beach County. This venue opened in 2011 and has a seating capacity of 29,491.   In addition to the Women’s College Cup, FAU Stadium was recently selected to host the Boca Raton Bowl in 2014, a nationally televised college football bowl game created by ESPN.  FAU Athletics partnered with the Palm Beach County Sports Commission in its proposal to the NCAA and the two will work closely to assure an outstanding event for the participants and fans.

“The Palm Beach County Sports Commission is excited to partner with Florida Atlantic University and the NCAA to host the Women’s College Cup at FAU Stadium,” said George Linley, Executive Director of the Palm Beach County Sports Commission. “Hosting a collegiate national championship solidifies Palm Beach County’s position as a premier sports destination.  This is a tremendous event that will showcase Florida Atlantic University, the City of Boca Raton and Palm Beach County on a national stage. We are excited to be home to the 2014 NCAA Women’s College Cup.”

The event is expected to be well received by a local soccer community that supports professional women’s soccer, international soccer, collegiate soccer and outstanding youth leagues.  "We are excited to be named the host of the 2014 Women's College Cup,” said Patrick Baker, FAU’s head women’s soccer coach. “A lot of people were involved and put a wonderful proposal together. We now have the opportunity to showcase the biggest event in women's college soccer on our campus. There are a number of great things happening within the FAU Athletic Department and this is a special event for the program, department, University and local community."

The Women’s College Cup is the pinnacle of collegiate soccer.   In addition to hosting the “Final Four” of women’s collegiate soccer, Palm Beach County will be home to the NCAA Fan Fest, which provides an interactive experience for visitors to celebrate the National Championship.  The community benefits will be widespread.  Thousands of alumni, students, and soccer enthusiasts will travel to Palm Beach County and Florida Atlantic University to experience the Women’s College Cup.  The influx of visitors will provide a significant boost to the local economy by filling hotels rooms and generating new revenues for restaurants, attractions, and the local business community.   The event will be televised live on ESPNU, showcasing Palm Beach County and Florida Atlantic University to a national audience.

 
About the Palm Beach County Sports Commission

The Palm Beach County Sports Commission is a private, not-for-profit organization contracted by Palm Beach County to promote and market the County as a sports and sports tourism destination. The Commission brings sporting events and activities to the County, enhances economic impact, stimulates bed tax revenues (primarily in the off-season), and maximizes utilization of County facilities. The Commission offers a full range of event service support, corporate partnerships, sponsorships and a local membership program that support its goals. Local, regional, national and international marketing efforts are ongoing by the Commission with sports organizations and event owners. The Commission also produces sports-related programs for the residents of Palm Beach County including the annual Lou Groza Awards program, the Palm Beach County Sports Hall of Fame, the Kids Fitness Festival of the Palm Beaches and awards the annual Sam Budnyk Student-Athlete Scholarship. For more information on the Palm Beach County Sports Commission go to www.palmbeachsports.com.

   

The pros and cons of paying college athletes


Recently, the matter of paying college athletes has made such a buzz in the sporting scene. If we are to look up what NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) - the implementing body in collegiate sports - has maintained regarding the issue, it's this; paying college athletes is a no-go. But this doesn't mean the "big guys" of the association have already made their final decision; debates are actually still going on even within the members of the board.

Why has this issue not been resolved yet? Is there really a need to change the norm of not providing the athletes extra money aside from those they get from traditional scholarships?

The Pros of Paying College Athletes

In this age where social media is the king, making a profit out of sports is even a more ludicrous pursuit. Schools are actually making more money than ever from the revenues of televised college sports, especially the most popular men's football and basketball.

However, the athletes involved in these games - the reason why sporting shows are such a hit in the first place - are not getting more than their scholarship grants; it is not even enough to cover for all their expenses; tuition, food, board, travel, books, and others. They have no other means to compensate for this need since sport practices take up all of their time after their academic responsibilities. Paying college students, a little extra, would actually go a long way, especially for the ones belonging to a family with low income.

If this point would be considered it might help to finally stop the abuses happening behind the scenes; abuses such as interested parties (i.e. recruiters) offering the athletes special "privileges" for favors as to how they wanted games to turn out. Shady business, yes, but it happens.

The Cons of Paying College Athletes

The main reason why paying college athletes still isn't legalized is because of the strong stand of the spirit of amateurism against the idea. Most traditionalists would also argue that college sports exist not so the athletes could gain profit, but to foster the true meaning of sportsmanship between colleges. Involving money in the equation for the players' participation would debase the essence of amateurism. Another big problem with the idea is its mere "unfairness" to less popular sports that acquire little to no revenue, and of course to the colleges with lesser funds. Who would be responsible for paying the students in this case? And what system will be used; do athletes with better performance get more pay than other members of the team?

These things and a lot more only would result to many complexities, and thus, paying college athletes might indeed just deviate the students from what they went to their respective institutions in the first place, that is, to get a degree, not to gain a salary.

For more information about the issues surrounding college athletes, check out these helpful tip sheets: Paying College Athletes and High School Scholarships.

By Jane Dabad
   

U-Michigan to receive $200 million from Miami Dolphins owner Stephen M. Ross


Gift represents largest single donation in U-M history and brings Ross’ total giving to the university to $313 million; Athletic Campus to be named the Stephen M. Ross Athletic Campus

With this gift, Ross becomes the third largest donor to a business school in the United States

ANN ARBOR ---Real estate developer and alumnus Stephen M. Ross will give $200 million to the University of Michigan to significantly transform the student experience at the business school and athletic campus.

Ross' gift is the largest single donation in U-M history and makes him the biggest donor to his alma mater with lifetime giving of more than $313 million. The Stephen M. Ross School of Business and U-M Athletics will each receive $100 million.

With this gift, Ross becomes the third largest donor to a business school in the United States. Ross is chairman and founder of Related Companies, one of the most prominent real estate developers in the world. Related Companies is best known for the development of Time Warner Center in New York and the 26-acre Hudson Yards development currently underway on Manhattan’s west side. Ross is also the owner of the Miami Dolphins.

In keeping with Ross' professional and philanthropic vision for business education and athletics at U-M, projects will be designed to create contemporary spaces for the nearly 6,000 students who take courses at the U-M Stephen M. Ross School of Business and the 900-plus student athletes in all sports. In addition, scholarships will be available for Ross students. Specific projects will be announced in the coming months.

"Stephen Ross' vision has always been about the ability of facilities to transform the human experience," said U-M President Mary Sue Coleman. "He understands the power of well-conceived spaces, and his generosity will benefit generations of Michigan students, faculty and coaches.

"This historic gift is not only an investment in the University of Michigan, but also in our state. Steve Ross believes deeply in our collective future as national and global leaders," Coleman said.

Ross has agreed to serve as the chair of the university’s Victors for Michigan Campaign that will kick off on Nov. 8.

In 2004, Ross gave $100 million toward a new building and endowed operations for the business school, which was renamed in recognition of his gift. The building was completed in 2009.

"Stephen Ross provided us with the resources and vision to develop our signature Ross building.  His most recent gift will allow us to build on that success and create a true business campus – one that features innovative design and advanced technology to empower students and faculty who share our mission to develop leaders who make a positive difference in the world," said Alison Davis-Blake, Edward J. Frey Dean of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business.

Ross said: "The University of Michigan had a profound impact on my life and I have received enormous satisfaction from being able to give back to the institution that played such a critical role in my success. I am thrilled to be able to make such an impactful contribution and to not only help write the next chapter for the University, but also offer much-needed scholarships to ensure we continue to attract the best and the brightest students and provide them with the financial resources they need.

"I am confident that the initiatives we undertake will further transform the business school and athletic facilities and ensure the University Michigan continues to offer a world-class institution for our future leaders. I could not be more proud."

The Ross School of Business proposes to create:

·         New spaces for students to study, collaborate and connect with each other, faculty and potential employers.

·         A state-of-the-art career services space including an enhanced recruiting center to connect students with the best companies and careers.

·         New spaces to support an "admission to alumni" approach to student and career services with dynamic events and opportunities on campus and beyond.

·         A space to bring together faculty, students and corporate partners to create practice-oriented research on topics of key importance to local and global firms.

·         Classrooms infused with advanced technology and innovative design to support in-person and virtual collaboration and connectivity on a global scale.

·         The new and existing facilities will be seamlessly integrated both inside and out to create one campus.

·         Scholarships for Ross students.

In previous donations to U-M Athletics, Ross gave a $5 million lead gift to create the Stephen M. Ross Academic Center, which provides study space on the athletic campus. Additional past gifts include $5 million for the stadium expansion project and $50,000 to the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts for the Henry Pearce Endowed Scholarship, and scholarship support for student athletes.

"Stephen Ross shares our vision for an Athletic Campus that provides every student-athlete access to world-class facilities to successfully train and compete at the highest level athletically and academically," said Dave Brandon, the Donald R. Shepherd Director of Athletics. "Steve made his first gift to athletics to help build our Ross Academic Center and is now making a commitment to Michigan Athletics that will impact over 900 student-athletes across all 31 of our teams. We are excited and grateful for Steve’s generous support, and we look forward to appropriately recognizing Steve and celebrating this historic gift."

Michigan Athletics proposes to improve its Athletic campus to:

·         Provide student-athletes on all 31 teams with the necessary resources to be academically and athletically successful.

·         Develop state-of-the-art facilities that create a sense of community, identity and tradition for all of our teams.

·         Create additional spaces that help student-athletes develop skills for success after athletics.

·         Build facilities that are a destination for local, state, national and international competitions.

The campus will be named the Stephen M. Ross Athletic Campus in recognition for this transformative gift, pending approval by the U-M Board of Regents.

Ross earned his Bachelor of Business Administration in accounting from the U-M Business School in 1962, a law degree from Wayne State University and a master of law degree in taxation from New York University. He began his career as a tax attorney at Coopers & Lybrand in Detroit.  He serves on the executive committee and is a trustee of Lincoln Center, is a trustee of New York Presbyterian Hospital and the Guggenheim Foundation and a director of the World Resources Institute and the Jackie Robinson Foundation. Earlier this year, Ross committed to give half or more of his wealth to philanthropic causes and charitable organizations, including some based in South Florida. The commitment was made through the Giving Pledge, a long-term, global initiative created by Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates that aims to inspire deeper engagement in philanthropy and increase charitable giving globally. In addition, his contribution to Michigan athletics isn’t his first to an athletic program at one of his alma maters. His high school, Miami Beach High School, named its football field Ross Field, in recognition of his work to spearhead the refurbishment of that facility.

The Ross School of Business is a distinctive learning community grounded in the principle that business can be an extraordinary vehicle for positive change in today's dynamic global economy. The school's focus on positive business practices, a boundaryless approach to problem solving, analytic rigor and action-based learning makes Ross a world-class, top-ranked business school.

For more on the Ross School of Business, visit: http://www.bus.umich.edu

   

CBS cashes in on best March Madness ratings in 19 years


From College News - 23 million people tuned in to the championship game
March Madness has always been, and always will be, a cash cow for whichever network has the rights to broadcast the action on TV. College basketball is popular on its own, to be sure, but March Madness brings out fans like very few sports events can.
For a few weeks in March, everyone cares about college basketball. This March, it was no different. The tournament had its fair share of great moments; Wichita State upset higher-seeded teams like Ohio State and Gonzaga; underdog Florida Gulf Coast went farther than anyone on earth thought they could; Trey Burke’s 30-foot three pointer in the waning seconds of Michigan’s game was exactly the kind of buzzerbeater people watch the tournament for.
But the real winner this year was the networks that hosted the tournament. This year’s championship game drew a viewership total of 23.4 million, a 12 percent increase from last year, according to CBS. As a whole, the tournament on any given day averaged 10.7 million viewers; that’s an 11 percent increase from last year and the highest average total in 19 years, according to Bloomberg.
CBS paid $10.8 billion for the rights to March Madness through 2024. Right now, that investment is looking priceless. For the fourth straight year, CBS stocks rose sharply due to tournament viewership totals; this year, the network’s stock rose 7.6 percent in March. CBS and its sister networks (TruTV, TBS, TNT) aired 67 games in total and recorded more than $1 billion in ad revenue.
Not bad for less than a month’s worth of work.
Interestingly, the relationship between networks and sports are getting cozier by the minute. ESPN, TBS and FOX are paying Major League Baseball a total of $12.4 billion worth of TV contracts. ESPN will pay the NCAA $7 billion just to air the college football playoffs. Time Warner Cable is considering creating an entire network around the Los Angeles Dodgers, which would cost $8 billion over 25 years.
It may cost a lot to buy the rights to air these sports. But for the networks, these events are truly priceless.
From College News - 23 million people tuned in to the championship game

March Madness has always been, and always will be, a cash cow for whichever network has the rights to broadcast the action on TV. College basketball is popular on its own, to be sure, but March Madness brings out fans like very few sports events can.

For a few weeks in March, everyone cares about college basketball. This March, it was no different. The tournament had its fair share of great moments; Wichita State upset higher-seeded teams like Ohio State and Gonzaga; underdog Florida Gulf Coast went farther than anyone on earth thought they could; Trey Burke’s 30-foot three pointer in the waning seconds of Michigan’s game was exactly the kind of buzzerbeater people watch the tournament for.

But the real winner this year was the networks that hosted the tournament. This year’s championship game drew a viewership total of 23.4 million, a 12 percent increase from last year, according to CBS. As a whole, the tournament on any given day averaged 10.7 million viewers; that’s an 11 percent increase from last year and the highest average total in 19 years, according to Bloomberg.

CBS paid $10.8 billion for the rights to March Madness through 2024. Right now, that investment is looking priceless. For the fourth straight year, CBS stocks rose sharply due to tournament viewership totals; this year, the network’s stock rose 7.6 percent in March. CBS and its sister networks (TruTV, TBS, TNT) aired 67 games in total and recorded more than $1 billion in ad revenue.

Not bad for less than a month’s worth of work.

Interestingly, the relationship between networks and sports are getting cozier by the minute. ESPN, TBS and FOX are paying Major League Baseball a total of $12.4 billion worth of TV contracts. ESPN will pay the NCAA $7 billion just to air the college football playoffs. Time Warner Cable is considering creating an entire network around the Los Angeles Dodgers, which would cost $8 billion over 25 years.

It may cost a lot to buy the rights to air these sports. But for the networks, these events are truly priceless.
   

Best colleges for tailgating

tradition

America’s fastest growing sport.” Perhaps calling tailgating a sport is a bit of a stretch, but when you think of all the calories burned trying to digest all the calories you’re taking in, you can see how it can really take some strength and endurance!
From beer pong to barbecue and banner marches to bratwurst-eating competitions, tailgating adds another dimension to college football game day. Let’s take a look at five of the best colleges for tailgating:
1. University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin
The land of cheese and beer goes all in for game day. The Badgers know how to party and do not make any apologizes for it. The event starts first thing in the morning with games of beer pong, and continue well after the last touchdown. At th University of Wisconsin at Madison, you can always find some bratwurst to be had with a great local beer.
2. Penn State - University Park, Pennsylvania
The Nittany Lions are one of the most storied teams of college sports, boasting the most wins in Big 10 college sports and the second-largest stadium in the Western Hemisphere, with a total seating of 107,282. To get the best seats in this very large house, a tent-city tradition has been honored for years by students looking for primo tickets. It is not known as the rowdiest of tailgating scenes, but it does offer a hometown feel that is unique.
3. Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge, Louisiana
The LSU Tigers’ tailgating scene has some of the most unique and regional food options available. The aromas of barbecued catfish and craw daddies, hot jambalaya and other Cajun delicacies fill the parking lot. With this being Louisiana, expect large numbers of eccentric characters and costumed fans. Most of the college’s home games are also played at night, adding another dimension to the party.
4. University of South California - Los Angeles, California
For a city that doesn’t have its own professional football team, the USC Trojans sure do make up for it. The diversity of Los Angeles brings out endless food and drink options, from burritos to burgers. And with it being so close to Hollywood, it's common to see celebrities come down to enjoy their own tailgating experiences.
5. Auburn University - Auburn, Alabama
The tigers of Auburn have a loyal fan base that camps out along the streets leading into town in the days leading up to game day. The school also has a tradition held over from the 1960s called "The Tiger Walk," where the players walk through the fan base to the stadium before the game. The atmosphere is known for its great food and Southern hospitality.

The national college football season is in full swing, with stadiums boasting attendance in the six figures — and that’s just the fans who actually get into the stadium! For the rest, the game day doesn’t necessarily have to include tickets because there’s always a lot of beer, food and fun to be had while tailgating.

Tailgating is an American sporting pastime, and according to Tailgater Monthly , it's becoming “America’s fastest growing sport.” Perhaps calling tailgating a sport is a bit of a stretch, but when you think of all the calories burned trying to digest all the calories you’re taking in, you can see how it can really take some strength and endurance!

 

From beer pong to barbecue and banner marches to bratwurst-eating competitions, tailgating adds another dimension to college football game day. Let’s take a look at five of the best colleges for tailgating:

 

1. University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin

The land of cheese and beer goes all in for game day. The Badgers know how to party and do not make any apologizes for it. The event starts first thing in the morning with games of beer pong, and continue well after the last touchdown. At th University of Wisconsin at Madison, you can always find some bratwurst to be had with a great local beer.

 

2. Penn State - University Park, Pennsylvania

The Nittany Lions are one of the most storied teams of college sports, boasting the most wins in Big 10 college sports and the second-largest stadium in the Western Hemisphere, with a total seating of 107,282. To get the best seats in this very large house, a tent-city tradition has been honored for years by students looking for primo tickets. It is not known as the rowdiest of tailgating scenes, but it does offer a hometown feel that is unique.

 

3. Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge, Louisiana

The LSU Tigers’ tailgating scene has some of the most unique and regional food options available. The aromas of barbecued catfish and craw daddies, hot jambalaya and other Cajun delicacies fill the parking lot. With this being Louisiana, expect large numbers of eccentric characters and costumed fans. Most of the college’s home games are also played at night, adding another dimension to the party.

 

4. University of South California - Los Angeles, California

For a city that doesn’t have its own professional football team, the USC Trojans sure do make up for it. The diversity of Los Angeles brings out endless food and drink options, from burritos to burgers. And with it being so close to Hollywood, it's common to see celebrities come down to enjoy their own tailgating experiences.

 

5. Auburn University - Auburn, Alabama

The tigers of Auburn have a loyal fan base that camps out along the streets leading into town in the days leading up to game day. The school also has a tradition held over from the 1960s called "The Tiger Walk," where the players walk through the fan base to the stadium before the game. The atmosphere is known for its great food and Southern hospitality.


By Sarah Fudin -- she works in community relations for University of Southern California Rossier School of Education's online masters programs.  USC Rossier Online teaches aspiring teachers how to become a teacher and provides the opportunity to earn a Masters of Education.  Outside of work Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt. 
   

Getting the most out of your college's sports

uga baseball

Getting the Most Out of Your College's Sports
It's the fall semester of a new school year, and college sports are in full swing. Although there are plenty of great college sports to follow, almost the entire country gets swept up in the top divisions of college football and basketball. Need some proof? Some college football stadiums are filled and attended by as many as 90,000 people per game, and there is the traditional annual announcement of President Obama’s bracket picks for the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) basketball championships.
Whether it is state or regional pride, alumni loyalty or the admiration of heart and dedication displayed by college athletes, there is no doubt that the country is in love with its college sports. In case you are a new fan or are trying to dedicate yourself as a more spirited spectator, here are five tips for getting the most out of your college’s sports:
1. Become a Fan
Choosing a school to root for should be as easy as showing up on orientation day. Perhaps you grew up rooting for a parent’s or sibling’s alma mater, but unless you followed in their footsteps, your school should probably be your team. But there is the question of how college teams are divided up and rated. For this, you can check out this introduction to college sports . It will give you the basics of the NCAA and its conferences, as well as the basics of college football and basketball.
2. Follow Teams
Learning the names of every member of a team’s roster isn’t necessary for following your team. But you will want to keep up to date on which teams they will be playing in the future and also what their current record is for the season. For this, you can go to your team's website, check the school paper or even watch some ESPN.
3. Go to Games
This is your chance to be a spectator of the spectacle! Going to your school’s stadium on game day is a major regional event. Alumni and fans from all over come into town wearing their colors to tailgate and catch the game. There is almost always a pep rally involved, with homemade banners and mascot cameos. Most colleges have a lively tailgating scene complete with regional food and beverages.
4. Become Part of the Local Sports Community
If there is no home game that week or if you’ve graduated already, you can always check in with local bars or student/fan organizations to go to game viewings. Sometimes these are in student centers, in outdoor venues on large screens or even broadcast in the team's stadium for the full experience of cheering along with your team's dedicated supporters.
5. Play Video Games
Video games can really deepen your knowledge and comprehension of a sport. Today’s video games bring a level of realism that is utilized by the athletes themselves as a training tool. The EA Sports NCAA titles feature update-able rosters with real life statistics and rating systems to give you a better understanding of which teams and players to watch. You will also learn more about the terminology, strategy and play development, which will make you a more informed and in-depth spectator.
By Joshua John -- he currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California’s Virtual Master of Social Work program, which provides social workers the opportunity to earn an online social work degree  and apply for a social work license . He also loves gadgets, movies, and all things Batman. Follow him on twitter  @joshuavjohn.

It's the fall semester of a new school year, and college sports are in full swing. Although there are plenty of great college sports to follow, almost the entire country gets swept up in the top divisions of college football and basketball. Need some proof? Some college football stadiums are filled and attended by as many as 90,000 people per game, and there is the traditional annual announcement of President Obama’s bracket picks for the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) basketball championships.

Whether it is state or regional pride, alumni loyalty or the admiration of heart and dedication displayed by college athletes, there is no doubt that the country is in love with its college sports. In case you are a new fan or are trying to dedicate yourself as a more spirited spectator, here are five tips for getting the most out of your college’s sports:

1. Become a Fan -- Choosing a school to root for should be as easy as showing up on orientation day. Perhaps you grew up rooting for a parent’s or sibling’s alma mater, but unless you followed in their footsteps, your school should probably be your team. But there is the question of how college teams are divided up and rated. For this, you can check out this introduction to college sports. It will give you the basics of the NCAA and its conferences, as well as the basics of college football and basketball.

2. Follow Teams -- Learning the names of every member of a team’s roster isn’t necessary for following your team. But you will want to keep up to date on which teams they will be playing in the future and also what their current record is for the season. For this, you can go to your team's website, check the school paper or even watch some ESPN.

3. Go to Games -- This is your chance to be a spectator of the spectacle! Going to your school’s stadium on game day is a major regional event. Alumni and fans from all over come into town wearing their colors to tailgate and catch the game. There is almost always a pep rally involved, with homemade banners and mascot cameos. Most colleges have a lively tailgating scene complete with regional food and beverages.

4. Become Part of the Local Sports Community -- If there is no home game that week or if you’ve graduated already, you can always check in with local bars or student/fan organizations to go to game viewings. Sometimes these are in student centers, in outdoor venues on large screens or even broadcast in the team's stadium for the full experience of cheering along with your team's dedicated supporters.

5. Play Video Games -- Video games can really deepen your knowledge and comprehension of a sport. Today’s video games bring a level of realism that is utilized by the athletes themselves as a training tool. The EA Sports NCAA titles feature update-able rosters with real life statistics and rating systems to give you a better understanding of which teams and players to watch. You will also learn more about the terminology, strategy and play development, which will make you a more informed and in-depth spectator.

By Joshua John -- he currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California’s Virtual Master of Social Work program, which provides social workers the opportunity to earn an online social work degree  and apply for a social work license. He also loves gadgets, movies, and all things Batman. Follow him on twitter  @joshuavjohn.
   

It is important to weigh options when considering athletic scholarships for college

football-money

You have the dilemma all high school student athletes hope to consider. Several colleges are recruiting you, and all of them are offering you a full athletic scholarship. Each scholarship packet sounds ideal, but you don't have a clue how to discern which one is best for you. Like any offer, you have to evaluate the pros and cons. Scholarship offers are no different. By weighing the options, and doing some deductive reasoning, you will narrow down your choices and ultimately accept the scholarship that is right for you.
When offered an athletic scholarship, you must evaluate all options carefully. The biggest draw to such an offer is the money. How much money does the scholarship packet provide? Although some schools offer more money than others, it should not be the deciding factor in accepting the scholarship. In short, don't necessarily jump at the offer that offers the most money. There may be restrictions attached.
Do your research and ask pertinent questions about restrictions. Some nonathletic scholarship prohibits you from using their money, if you are receiving an athletic scholarship. And the same could be true of the athletic scholarship. If you have more than one scholarship opportunities at a given school, the restriction would force you to give up additional monies that could finance your education.
Does the scholarship offer come from a college you believe is best for you? To answer this important question, you must consider a few things. Is the size of the school conducive to learning? Are the academics too rigorous or not challenging enough? Do you like the location of the school? What about the weather? This is crucial in that you may want to remain there upon graduation, so you must look at career opportunities beyond graduating.
Which college will provide you with the most opportunities to showcase your athletic abilities? No athlete wants to go off to college, participate in practice sessions, and then warm the bench because there are so many other good athletes on board. In that situation, you will never be able to grow and develop in your sport. Ask your high school coach if he knows, or if he can find out, how freshmen and sophomore athletes are treated. You will want to know exactly what you are walking in to.
If you can, make a college visit before deciding upon which scholarship to accept. Most athletic scholarships come with a nice perk of visiting the college on the university's dime. If this is this case, take advantage of it. Talk to other players and athletes about their experience at the school. Ask key questions: Did you get a fair amount of playtime as a freshman? How do you feel about the coaching instruction?
Your ultimate goal for accepting an athletic scholarship is to pursue a career as a professional athlete. Consequently, you will want to know about the college's history of cultivating and nurturing players to professional level. Be sure to ask how many college athletes went on to become professional sports players. What are their names and where are they now? How involved were the coaches in helping college athletes each professional standing?
This is one of the most important times of your life. Finding the right scholarship for college and accepting the best scholarship offer should not be taken lightly. Don't jump at the first offer without evaluating every option. Keep your eye on the prize. Be sure the college you select for your online degree supports you academic and interest wise.
By Guy Montag
You have the dilemma all high school student athletes hope to consider. Several colleges are recruiting you, and all of them are offering you a full athletic scholarship. Each scholarship packet sounds ideal, but you don't have a clue how to discern which one is best for you. Like any offer, you have to evaluate the pros and cons. Scholarship offers are no different. By weighing the options, and doing some deductive reasoning, you will narrow down your choices and ultimately accept the scholarship that is right for you.

When offered an athletic scholarship, you must evaluate all options carefully. The biggest draw to such an offer is the money. How much money does the scholarship packet provide? Although some schools offer more money than others, it should not be the deciding factor in accepting the scholarship. In short, don't necessarily jump at the offer that offers the most money. There may be restrictions attached.

Do your research and ask pertinent questions about restrictions. Some nonathletic scholarship prohibits you from using their money, if you are receiving an athletic scholarship. And the same could be true of the athletic scholarship. If you have more than one scholarship opportunities at a given school, the restriction would force you to give up additional monies that could finance your education.

Does the scholarship offer come from a college you believe is best for you? To answer this important question, you must consider a few things. Is the size of the school conducive to learning? Are the academics too rigorous or not challenging enough? Do you like the location of the school? What about the weather? This is crucial in that you may want to remain there upon graduation, so you must look at career opportunities beyond graduating.

Which college will provide you with the most opportunities to showcase your athletic abilities? No athlete wants to go off to college, participate in practice sessions, and then warm the bench because there are so many other good athletes on board. In that situation, you will never be able to grow and develop in your sport. Ask your high school coach if he knows, or if he can find out, how freshmen and sophomore athletes are treated. You will want to know exactly what you are walking in to.

If you can, make a college visit before deciding upon which scholarship to accept. Most athletic scholarships come with a nice perk of visiting the college on the university's dime. If this is this case, take advantage of it. Talk to other players and athletes about their experience at the school. Ask key questions: Did you get a fair amount of playtime as a freshman? How do you feel about the coaching instruction?
Your ultimate goal for accepting an athletic scholarship is to pursue a career as a professional athlete. Consequently, you will want to know about the college's history of cultivating and nurturing players to professional level. Be sure to ask how many college athletes went on to become professional sports players. What are their names and where are they now? How involved were the coaches in helping college athletes each professional standing?

This is one of the most important times of your life. Finding the right scholarship for college and accepting the best scholarship offer should not be taken lightly. Don't jump at the first offer without evaluating every option. Keep your eye on the prize. Be sure the college you select for your online degree supports you academic and interest wise.

By Guy Montag
   

Joining a gym: college student skinny on dumbbells

dumbbells

Starting to pucker the seams on your jeans or poochie-poochie over the front a bit? Most likely it isn’t the addition of your Under Armour 2.0 base layer (a great excuse); no, this it the beginning of the college 10,15, 25 or 50lbs. It is very tempting to just crawl back into bed and stay there with a bag of chips. But Wait! In college it is easy to stop weight gain before it becomes a big problem. One of the best ways to beat the bulge is to get into a gym habit. Trips to the gym are as necessary to college survival as dorm supplies or a good cell phone plan. The question isn’t whether you should work out but where should you work out and how often.
Look into Your School’s Gym Facilities
Most colleges have at least one gym on campus. Often you can use the gym and take classes for very little just by being a student. This is often the best alternative because college gyms are cheap, clean and full of innovative machines that are used to keep the football and basketball teams happy. Moreover, the gyms are on campus so you can schedule gym time between other classes. The downside of college gyms is that sometimes the hours are limited and certain facilities like the pool can be closed when they are in use by various classes and teams.
Check Out National Gym Chains and Promotions
National gym chains like 24 Hour Fitness and Gold’s Gym are also an alternative. These gyms are usually inexpensive and they have very generous hours. Another advantage to national gym chains is that the membership dues can lock in at the current rate and continue at this rate for as long as you are a member. These gyms usually offer a variety of free classes and services and the machinery is up to date. Look for 7-day trial memberships to try out these gyms for free before joining.
The downside of these gyms is that they can be very crowded at peak hours and the classes can be so full you can hardly get into them. In addition, check out the amenities such as the stream, sauna and showers carefully even if you aren’t planning to use them. Sometimes these can be downright horrible and there isn’t anything worse than needing a shower and being faced with a tiny trickle of cold water.
Local Community Centers Have Gyms and Classes
Many local community centers also have gym facilities and classes available at very reasonable rates. Private community groups such as the YMCA and JCC  have gyms and facilities that are often excellent and available to anyone who wants to join.
Things to Look for in a Gym Membership
Amenities, spa, pool, sauna, showers, lockers, basketball courts, etc.
Cost, savings available for yearly plans
Student discounts
Locations, convenience
Gym hours
Classes and class schedules
Certified trainers and instructors
Sports therapists available
Cleanliness
Busy, overcrowded
Extra curricular activities and programs
Quality and variety of machines and weights, and their maintenance
Weights and machinery for women
By Jen Thames
From College News - Starting to pucker the seams on your jeans or poochie-poochie over the front a bit? Most likely it isn’t the addition of your Under Armour 2.0 base layer (a great excuse); no, this it the beginning of the college 10,15, 25 or 50lbs. It is very tempting to just crawl back into bed and stay there with a bag of chips. But Wait! In college it is easy to stop weight gain before it becomes a big problem. One of the best ways to beat the bulge is to get into a gym habit. Trips to the gym are as necessary to college survival as dorm supplies or a good cell phone plan. The question isn’t whether you should work out but where should you work out and how often.

Look into Your School’s Gym Facilities
Most colleges have at least one gym on campus. Often you can use the gym and take classes for very little just by being a student. This is often the best alternative because college gyms are cheap, clean and full of innovative machines that are used to keep the football and basketball teams happy. Moreover, the gyms are on campus so you can schedule gym time between other classes. The downside of college gyms is that sometimes the hours are limited and certain facilities like the pool can be closed when they are in use by various classes and teams.

Check Out National Gym Chains and Promotions
National gym chains like 24 Hour Fitness and Gold’s Gym are also an alternative. These gyms are usually inexpensive and they have very generous hours. Another advantage to national gym chains is that the membership dues can lock in at the current rate and continue at this rate for as long as you are a member. These gyms usually offer a variety of free classes and services and the machinery is up to date. Look for 7-day trial memberships to try out these gyms for free before joining.

The downside of these gyms is that they can be very crowded at peak hours and the classes can be so full you can hardly get into them. In addition, check out the amenities such as the stream, sauna and showers carefully even if you aren’t planning to use them. Sometimes these can be downright horrible and there isn’t anything worse than needing a shower and being faced with a tiny trickle of cold water.

Local Community Centers Have Gyms and Classes
Many local community centers also have gym facilities and classes available at very reasonable rates. Private community groups such as the YMCA and JCC  have gyms and facilities that are often excellent and available to anyone who wants to join.

Things to Look for in a Gym Membership
  • Amenities, spa, pool, sauna, showers, lockers, basketball courts, etc.
  • Cost, savings available for yearly plans
  • Student discounts
  • Locations, convenience
  • Gym hours
  • Classes and class schedules
  • Certified trainers and instructors
  • Sports therapists available
  • CleanlinessBusy, overcrowded
  • Extra curricular activities and programs
  • Quality and variety of machines and weights, and their maintenance
  • Weights and machinery for women

By Jen Thames
   

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