Noodle: the Google of college search

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Junior and senior years of high school are full of tough decisions: Where should I go to college? What is the right program for me? Can I afford it? While Google is the go-to search engine for just about everything, more personalized options are now available for education information.
Noodle , an educational search engine, was started in 2011 by John Katzman, the founder of The Princeton Review and 2tor Inc. While Google is an efficient search engine, Noodle is specifically geared towards finding information on education, from locating a tutor for a child with special needs to finding the closest graduate school of business. Noodle's goal  is “to provide a recommendation engine to help anyone find educational opportunities at all levels, from K-12 to college, grad school, weekend classes and professional development.” Noodle was founded on the basis that students often choose the “obvious school instead of the right school.”
Guidance counselors, high school students’ parents and, of course, students themselves can reap the benefits of Noodle. It is simple to use. For example: A high school senior may be looking for local programs in criminal justice. He would head to Noodle's home page  and enter relevant keywords into the search bar, such as “associates program criminal justice.” Noodle will then ask several questions to customize the search, like  “What did you score on the SAT?” After answering these questions, school profiles are delivered, with information on the schools' selectivity, cost, size and other details. Links to the schools’ sites are also included, as well as reviews.
While Noodle is still in its early stages, its future looks promising. Besides giving high school students a personalized college search experience, it offers assistance to students of any age. In the future, it will offer information on medical schools, community colleges and continuing education, among other opportunities. Users can register for a free account to be able to share search information with guidance counselors, parents, friends and others. Students can also connect with others interested in the same colleges (a great way to meet future classmates!).
If an educational institution search based on your grades, budget and personality is not enough, Noodle also offers quality articles geared towards specific grade levels. Noodlings  is full of advice on financial aid, transitions, teaching methodology and other useful topics. There is even a section devoted to study abroad.
To be clear, Noodle is not just another search engine. Forbes included it on its list of the 10 greatest industry disruptive startups of 2012; Ed Surge considered it one of the six “most likely to succeed” companies; it has received multiple accolades and awards. It is the “single place for everything in education.” Where Google offers information on everything, Noodle has you covered for school.
Junior and senior years of high school are full of tough decisions: Where should I go to college? What is the right program for me? Can I afford it? While Google is the go-to search engine for just about everything, more personalized options are now available for education information.

Noodle , an educational search engine, was started in 2011 by John Katzman, the founder of The Princeton Review and 2tor Inc. While Google is an efficient search engine, Noodle is specifically geared towards finding information on education, from locating a tutor for a child with special needs to finding the closest graduate school of business. Noodle's goal  is “to provide a recommendation engine to help anyone find educational opportunities at all levels, from K-12 to college, grad school, weekend classes and professional development.” Noodle was founded on the basis that students often choose the “obvious school instead of the right school.” 

Guidance counselors, high school students’ parents and, of course, students themselves can reap the benefits of Noodle. It is simple to use. For example: A high school senior may be looking for local programs in criminal justice. He would head to Noodle's home page  and enter relevant keywords into the search bar, such as “associates program criminal justice.” Noodle will then ask several questions to customize the search, like  “What did you score on the SAT?” After answering these questions, school profiles are delivered, with information on the schools' selectivity, cost, size and other details. Links to the schools’ sites are also included, as well as reviews. 

While Noodle is still in its early stages, its future looks promising. Besides giving high school students a personalized college search experience, it offers assistance to students of any age. In the future, it will offer information on medical schools, community colleges and continuing education, among other opportunities. Users can register for a free account to be able to share search information with guidance counselors, parents, friends and others. Students can also connect with others interested in the same colleges (a great way to meet future classmates!). 

If an educational institution search based on your grades, budget and personality is not enough, Noodle also offers quality articles geared towards specific grade levels. Noodlings  is full of advice on financial aid, transitions, teaching methodology and other useful topics. There is even a section devoted to study abroad. 

To be clear, Noodle is not just another search engine. Forbes included it on its list of the 10 greatest industry disruptive startups of 2012; Ed Surge considered it one of the six “most likely to succeed” companies; it has received multiple accolades and awards. It is the “single place for everything in education.” Where Google offers information on everything, Noodle has you covered for school.

By Jeffrey Roe  -- community manager for the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education's online master's programs. USC Rossier Online provides current teachers and those working on becoming a teacher  with the opportunity to earn a masters in education . Jeff is a graduate of New Jersey City University. When he's not working, Jeff enjoys attending concerts and developing his talents as a videomaker. 

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