Careers

Building the network: from Facebook to face time

FB

From College News - College students are building business relationships to give them an edge in the job market.
Like many students, Matt Bojanic is introducing himself to campus alumni, collecting business cards and sending out his resumes.
The UCLA student is networking, the act of meeting and forming relationships with people in your field to gain an advantage in the job market. Last year, he attended an entertainment networking night sponsored by the campus’ student alumni association. He talked to panelists in the industry, exchanging contact information and asking them for tips on interviewing.
In the current economy, jobs are becoming harder than ever to come by for college graduates. Which makes networking all the more important.
“Success revolves around building the who-you-know network, because the job market has and always will be about who you know,” said Michael “Dr. Woody” Woodward, PhD, executive coach and author of The You Plan.
According to the Wall Street Journal, one in ten jobs come from a personal referral, whereas one in 219 comes from a job board, like Monster.com.
Woodward advised students to target their network based on the field or business they want to explore. Students should then get to know them by attending professional associations, community events and local chapters of a professional group.
Social media has also enabled students to make more connections than ever, with websites like LinkedIn and career networking apps on Facebook. Woodward recommends students use social media to whittle down to the key players and form targeted relationships. He also said students need to book “face time,” this is, picking up the phone to arrange a local meet up with the people their network. From there, members of their network will get to know the student personally and give them a better understanding of their job.
After finding their network, students should find an internship to test drive their career and develop an inside track, he said. Furthermore, many companies hire their interns and use the internship as an audition. Students will also be able to form a connection with the employer or colleagues, who can then link the student up with a job, he added.
Woodward said that students should not expect their network to do the work for them. Tell them what you’re interested in and know the questions you ask and what you want to get out of it, he said. He advises students to think of networking as a long term strategy, where a relationship can be beneficial down the road. With many workers in the company network getting laid off, it’s better to keep the network in the loop and update them with short and simple messages. An email once every three months could be reasonable. For instance, an aspiring writer can send their network links to the work they’ve done and ask for input on an article. One can even put up a schedule on when to keep in touch with the network and go through old emails to see who they may want to contact.
Once students meet up with a member of their network, they have to know their brand package and deliver that in a simple yet impactful sound bite, Woodward said. The three key elements are credibility, value and what makes the person stand out. For instance, someone can say what school they’re attending and what honor programs they’re in to establish legitimacy. To show value, they should research what their network is looking for and tell them how their past work relates to it. And third, they say something about themselves that separate them from most people.
It is never too late to start networking, said Katharine Hansen, associate publisher and creative director at Quintessential Careers.
Her favorite technique is informational interviewing, where students “interview” a professional about their job.
She said these interviews provide a way to develop a deeper personal connection with someone inside an organization and give them inside information that can later be used in the job search. Some of those interviews can also lead to contacts, jobs, or internship offers.
Hansen added there’s a misconception that networking is about “using people.” But people enjoy giving advice to people. And there are also plenty of people that students can network with, such as peer students, parents, parents of friends, professors, advisers and coaches.
For Bojanic, his connections with UCLA’s Alumni Association came in handy when an alumnus offered him an interview for a marketing internship for traveling stage shows.
Although he felt intimidated by networking at first, Bojanic said that ultimately the panelists at networking events want to talk to students and help them find jobs.
“The worst they can say is they’re busy, and rarely are you going to find someone who is rude,” he said.
By Cristina Chang
From College News - College students are building business relationships to give them an edge in the job market.

Like many students, Matt Bojanic is introducing himself to campus alumni, collecting business cards and sending out his resumes.

The UCLA student is networking, the act of meeting and forming relationships with people in your field to gain an advantage in the job market. Last year, he attended an entertainment networking night sponsored by the campus’ student alumni association. He talked to panelists in the industry, exchanging contact information and asking them for tips on interviewing.

In the current economy, jobs are becoming harder than ever to come by for college graduates. Which makes networking all the more important.

“Success revolves around building the who-you-know network, because the job market has and always will be about who you know,” said Michael “Dr. Woody” Woodward, PhD, executive coach and author of The You Plan.

According to the Wall Street Journal, one in ten jobs come from a personal referral, whereas one in 219 comes from a job board, like Monster.com.
Woodward advised students to target their network based on the field or business they want to explore. Students should then get to know them by attending professional associations, community events and local chapters of a professional group.

Social media has also enabled students to make more connections than ever, with websites like LinkedIn and career networking apps on Facebook. Woodward recommends students use social media to whittle down to the key players and form targeted relationships. He also said students need to book “face time,” this is, picking up the phone to arrange a local meet up with the people their network. From there, members of their network will get to know the student personally and give them a better understanding of their job.

After finding their network, students should find an internship to test drive their career and develop an inside track, he said. Furthermore, many companies hire their interns and use the internship as an audition. Students will also be able to form a connection with the employer or colleagues, who can then link the student up with a job, he added.

Woodward said that students should not expect their network to do the work for them. Tell them what you’re interested in and know the questions you ask and what you want to get out of it, he said. He advises students to think of networking as a long term strategy, where a relationship can be beneficial down the road. With many workers in the company network getting laid off, it’s better to keep the network in the loop and update them with short and simple messages. An email once every three months could be reasonable. For instance, an aspiring writer can send their network links to the work they’ve done and ask for input on an article. One can even put up a schedule on when to keep in touch with the network and go through old emails to see who they may want to contact.

Once students meet up with a member of their network, they have to know their brand package and deliver that in a simple yet impactful sound bite, Woodward said. The three key elements are credibility, value and what makes the person stand out. For instance, someone can say what school they’re attending and what honor programs they’re in to establish legitimacy. To show value, they should research what their network is looking for and tell them how their past work relates to it. And third, they say something about themselves that separate them from most people.

It is never too late to start networking, said Katharine Hansen, associate publisher and creative director at Quintessential Careers.

Her favorite technique is informational interviewing, where students “interview” a professional about their job.

She said these interviews provide a way to develop a deeper personal connection with someone inside an organization and give them inside information that can later be used in the job search. Some of those interviews can also lead to contacts, jobs, or internship offers.

Hansen added there’s a misconception that networking is about “using people.” But people enjoy giving advice to people. And there are also plenty of people that students can network with, such as peer students, parents, parents of friends, professors, advisers and coaches.

For Bojanic, his connections with UCLA’s Alumni Association came in handy when an alumnus offered him an interview for a marketing internship for traveling stage shows.
Although he felt intimidated by networking at first, Bojanic said that ultimately the panelists at networking events want to talk to students and help them find jobs.

“The worst they can say is they’re busy, and rarely are you going to find someone who is rude,” he said.

By Cristina Chang
   

Minimum wage raised to above $9 in Washington

collegemoney

From College News - Minimum wage hikes expected in Colorado, Montana, Ohio.
Hourly workers in Washington will be seeing a bit more money in their pockets. The Huffington Post reports that the minimum wage in Washington will be raised to $9.04 an hour, towering above the federal minimum wage of $7.25. This would make Washington the first state to raise minimum wage above $9 an hour.
Workers in Ohio, Colorado and Montana will also see a wage hike of between 28 and 30 cents. Oregon announced a similar move in September. Arizona, Florida and Vermont are expected to announce similar hikes next month.
Proponents for low-wage workers contend that higher minimum wages not only help workers provide for themselves and their families, but they also help put money back into local economies.
In 1998, Washington passed a proposal that tied minimum wage to the national consumer price index, thus assuring that minimum wage would rise according to inflation. Some states have followed in Washington’s footsteps with similar initiatives.
By Janelle Vreeland
From College News - Minimum wage hikes expected in Colorado, Montana, Ohio.

Hourly workers in Washington will be seeing a bit more money in their pockets. The Huffington Post reports that the minimum wage in Washington will be raised to $9.04 an hour, towering above the federal minimum wage of $7.25. This would make Washington the first state to raise minimum wage above $9 an hour.

Workers in Ohio, Colorado and Montana will also see a wage hike of between 28 and 30 cents. Oregon announced a similar move in September. Arizona, Florida and Vermont are expected to announce similar hikes next month.

Proponents for low-wage workers contend that higher minimum wages not only help workers provide for themselves and their families, but they also help put money back into local economies.

In 1998, Washington passed a proposal that tied minimum wage to the national consumer price index, thus assuring that minimum wage would rise according to inflation. Some states have followed in Washington’s footsteps with similar initiatives.

By Janelle Vreeland
   

College careers after graduation - gain experience and expand your resume

Graduation

Most prospective college graduates today will find themselves in the unenviable position of having no career prospects and no entry-level professional job. Even though they have paid $200,000 for four years, they will find that the task of career implementation rests solely with them. The college placement office is, in most instances, useless.
You must begin to prepare for your career now. And, as a general rule, work in your field as soon as possible after you graduate. The next class of graduates will be right on your heals. I hate to put it so bluntly but no one wants to hire the unemployed. Most supervisors in most fields want bragging rights to the best people.
OK, so lets begin. There are three main points that you must agree to if this is to work:
First, forget all thoughts of taking it easy after graduation. Forget the trip to Europe and time you will spend with Auntie Em in New Zealand. You need to get to work now!
Second, you will need to become self-taught in the practicalities of your field. You need an immediate understanding that you probably did not receive in college. Most full-time professors who have their PhD cannot teach the practicalities and technical requirements of a "real" job. Most are strictly academics and have spent little time working in their field.
Third, you must create a career process that works similar to the environment in top-tier schools. Ivy league graduates help other Ivy league graduates get jobs. Networking among friends and former graduates of their school is key for them. You must begin to think like they do.
Step One-Make friends in your major field.
Forget about social fraternities and sororities. While in college make friends with other students in your major field who have similar values and career aspirations. Choose them wisely. They should have excellent work habits and be high achievers. You may have three, five or a dozen people in your association. The number is not important. But each associate must have a clear understanding that all of you must work together to achieve the professional career goals of all members.
Step Two-Get your friends in a think-tank group.
You must first draw up a game plan that works to help all members of your group attain employment. Consult the internet and learn the methods of experienced employees in your field. Tap into corporate websites and review report writing, strategies and concepts that corporations apply every day. (I do not suggest using textbooks as a resource since many of these authors also are full-time professors who have no experience in their field.)
Step Three-Incorporate
You can do this yourself or with a couple of members of your group. You are going to begin to think and act like a consulting company with one major difference: you will be providing your services for free. Your company will build a portfolio of reports, presentations, plans and strategies.
For example, risk management is becoming an important by-product of the corporate world. In fact almost every corporate initiative and plan can have a risk-management strategy. Think of it and plan it. These reports will become part of a portfolio that you will present to prospective employers as an example of work you have done for other organizations.
Step Four-Submit your reports and presentations.
If one of the associates in your group lands a job he or she should help the others by accepting reports and presentations. That person will become a key referral for you in your job search. And don't be afraid to network to professionals outside of your group (within your chosen profession) by offering your services free of charge.
Remember, to get a job today you need experience and referrals. You may also need to accept lower level entry employment as long as you can advance later.
This process (or variations of it) helps keep you in the game. You train yourself and give yourself experience. It shows you are a self-starter.
Never forget this: one year of non-activity and you could be out of the game.
This article was created by J Roberts also known as Professor Roberts. He is a noted counselor to parents and students alike and is the author of the book "Colleges Behind Closed Doors: What You Need to Know (Long) Before You Go." He is an authority on the inner-workings of colleges, college preparation, selection, and finances. Visit him at http://www.ProfessorRoberts.com.
Most prospective college graduates today will find themselves in the unenviable position of having no career prospects and no entry-level professional job. Even though they have paid $200,000 for four years, they will find that the task of career implementation rests solely with them. The college placement office is, in most instances, useless.

You must begin to prepare for your career now. And, as a general rule, work in your field as soon as possible after you graduate. The next class of graduates will be right on your heals. I hate to put it so bluntly but no one wants to hire the unemployed. Most supervisors in most fields want bragging rights to the best people.

OK, so lets begin. There are three main points that you must agree to if this is to work:

First, forget all thoughts of taking it easy after graduation. Forget the trip to Europe and time you will spend with Auntie Em in New Zealand. You need to get to work now!

Second, you will need to become self-taught in the practicalities of your field. You need an immediate understanding that you probably did not receive in college. Most full-time professors who have their PhD cannot teach the practicalities and technical requirements of a "real" job. Most are strictly academics and have spent little time working in their field.

Third, you must create a career process that works similar to the environment in top-tier schools. Ivy league graduates help other Ivy league graduates get jobs. Networking among friends and former graduates of their school is key for them. You must begin to think like they do.
Step One-Make friends in your major field.

Forget about social fraternities and sororities. While in college make friends with other students in your major field who have similar values and career aspirations. Choose them wisely. They should have excellent work habits and be high achievers. You may have three, five or a dozen people in your association. The number is not important. But each associate must have a clear understanding that all of you must work together to achieve the professional career goals of all members.

Step Two-Get your friends in a think-tank group.
You must first draw up a game plan that works to help all members of your group attain employment. Consult the internet and learn the methods of experienced employees in your field. Tap into corporate websites and review report writing, strategies and concepts that corporations apply every day. (I do not suggest using textbooks as a resource since many of these authors also are full-time professors who have no experience in their field.)

Step Three-Incorporate
You can do this yourself or with a couple of members of your group. You are going to begin to think and act like a consulting company with one major difference: you will be providing your services for free. Your company will build a portfolio of reports, presentations, plans and strategies.

For example, risk management is becoming an important by-product of the corporate world. In fact almost every corporate initiative and plan can have a risk-management strategy. Think of it and plan it. These reports will become part of a portfolio that you will present to prospective employers as an example of work you have done for other organizations.

Step Four-Submit your reports and presentations.
If one of the associates in your group lands a job he or she should help the others by accepting reports and presentations. That person will become a key referral for you in your job search. And don't be afraid to network to professionals outside of your group (within your chosen profession) by offering your services free of charge.

Remember, to get a job today you need experience and referrals. You may also need to accept lower level entry employment as long as you can advance later. This process (or variations of it) helps keep you in the game. You train yourself and give yourself experience. It shows you are a self-starter.

Never forget this: one year of non-activity and you could be out of the game.

This article was created by J Roberts also known as Professor Roberts. He is a noted counselor to parents and students alike and is the author of the book "Colleges Behind Closed Doors: What You Need to Know (Long) Before You Go." He is an authority on the inner-workings of colleges, college preparation, selection, and finances. Visit him at http://www.ProfessorRoberts.com.
   

Brand yourself: Five tips to help you stand out

brand_yourself1

From College News - These five tips will help put you ahead of the crowd.
Whether you have just begun your college journey, are about to begin your senior year or are in search of your first full-time job (or your second, but who’s counting anyway?), you’ve probably thought about tweaking your resume and drafting a cover letter to land you that awesome internship or job. Both your resume and cover letter are undoubtedly very important, but they are not the only things that can set you apart.
In today’s day and age, you not only need to focus on your initial outreach to an employer, but also your Internet image—also known as your personal brand.
If you haven’t thought about your personal brand, don’t fret! Here are five tips to help you get started as you create your brand:
1. Buy your name as a website domain
Domain names can be equated to real estate on the Internet – once you buy them, they’re yours!  Think about the endless opportunities when purchasing your name: You can post your resume, create a blog and distribute important information, all of which you can share with potential employers, family and friends. If your name isn’t available, see if you can get some variation of it. For example: JohnSmith.com may not be available, but perhaps JSmith1987.com is. Be creative and be conscious of your domain name as well as the content you share.
2. Create an About.me profile
About.me is a site created to help you share all of your Internet assets in one place. It’s a simple page that allows you to share your name, picture, a short bio and links with prospective employers. Like buying your domain name, it gives you a space to share what’s important to you, but in a succinct way. Once you create your profile, there is no heavy duty maintenance; just remember to update your About.me to reflect your most current information.
3.  Start a blog
Many employers are interested in your writing background. Are you a good writer? A simple way to demonstrate your writing abilities and impress your potential boss is by sharing writing samples. Think about creating a blog where you share your work. It shouldn’t be a chore, so make it interesting to you! To show that you’re well read and up to date in your field, you can also post other people’s interesting articles on your blog—just make sure to give them credit! The best part about your blog is that it can live on your domain name or a variety of other free blog hosting websites, like wordpress.org, tumblr.com or blog.com. If you’re not ready to start a blog, think about guest posting on other blogs; like I said, everyone’s looking for good writers!
4.  Do some spring cleaning on your Facebook page
You’ve heard those wretched stories from your friends, or friends of friends: “So-and-so didn’t get the job because the company that wanted to hire them found some incriminating photos on Facebook.” The truth is, most of us have Facebook and it’s a great way to stay in touch with your friends, family and the rest of the world. Facebook also provides a platform for us to connect and share with great people, businesses and brands. So go through your profile and make it professional. Sift through your photos and make sure they’re appropriate. Lastly, check out your privacy settings. Remember: You don’t have to share everything with everyone!
5.  Explore other social media options: Google+, Twitter and Linkedin
Take a look at other options to help your potential employer find you when googling you. Create a Google+ profile and test it out: You’ll have the chance to create separate groups of people with whom you share different information. Try out Twitter: It’s perfect to share quick, live news updates about your interests. And lastly, create a LinkedIn account: You’ll be able to create a professional profile that will surely be seen as an asset to any future employer.
You get it: Employers are online and they can find out a lot of information about you—but this doesn’t mean you have to remove yourself from the Internet, move to the North Pole and live in digital darkness for the rest of your life. Embrace the social technology that is sweeping the world today and use it to your advantage. Good luck and happy self-branding!
Sarah Fudin currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California’s Master of Arts in Teaching program, which provides aspiring teachers with the opportunity to earn a Master’s degree and teaching certificate online. Outside of work, Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt. Follow her on Twitter @sarahfudin.
By Sarah Fudin
From College News - These five tips will help put you ahead of the crowd.

Whether you have just begun your college journey, are about to begin your senior year or are in search of your first full-time job (or your second, but who’s counting anyway?), you’ve probably thought about tweaking your resume and drafting a cover letter to land you that awesome internship or job. Both your resume and cover letter are undoubtedly very important, but they are not the only things that can set you apart.

In today’s day and age, you not only need to focus on your initial outreach to an employer, but also your Internet image—also known as your personal brand.
If you haven’t thought about your personal brand, don’t fret! Here are five tips to help you get started as you create your brand:

1. Buy your name as a website domain - Domain names can be equated to real estate on the Internet – once you buy them, they’re yours!  Think about the endless opportunities when purchasing your name: You can post your resume, create a blog and distribute important information, all of which you can share with potential employers, family and friends. If your name isn’t available, see if you can get some variation of it. For example: JohnSmith.com may not be available, but perhaps JSmith1987.com is. Be creative and be conscious of your domain name as well as the content you share.

2. Create an About.me profile - About.me is a site created to help you share all of your Internet assets in one place. It’s a simple page that allows you to share your name, picture, a short bio and links with prospective employers. Like buying your domain name, it gives you a space to share what’s important to you, but in a succinct way. Once you create your profile, there is no heavy duty maintenance; just remember to update your About.me to reflect your most current information.

3.  Start a blog - Many employers are interested in your writing background. Are you a good writer? A simple way to demonstrate your writing abilities and impress your potential boss is by sharing writing samples. Think about creating a blog where you share your work. It shouldn’t be a chore, so make it interesting to you! To show that you’re well read and up to date in your field, you can also post other people’s interesting articles on your blog—just make sure to give them credit! The best part about your blog is that it can live on your domain name or a variety of other free blog hosting websites, like wordpress.org, tumblr.com or blog.com. If you’re not ready to start a blog, think about guest posting on other blogs; like I said, everyone’s looking for good writers!

4.  Do some spring cleaning on your Facebook page - You’ve heard those wretched stories from your friends, or friends of friends: “So-and-so didn’t get the job because the company that wanted to hire them found some incriminating photos on Facebook.” The truth is, most of us have Facebook and it’s a great way to stay in touch with your friends, family and the rest of the world. Facebook also provides a platform for us to connect and share with great people, businesses and brands. So go through your profile and make it professional. Sift through your photos and make sure they’re appropriate. Lastly, check out your privacy settings. Remember: You don’t have to share everything with everyone!

5.  Explore other social media options: Google+, Twitter and Linkedin Take a look at other options to help your potential employer find you when googling you. Create a Google+ profile and test it out: You’ll have the chance to create separate groups of people with whom you share different information. Try out Twitter: It’s perfect to share quick, live news updates about your interests. And lastly, create a LinkedIn account: You’ll be able to create a professional profile that will surely be seen as an asset to any future employer.

You get it: Employers are online and they can find out a lot of information about you—but this doesn’t mean you have to remove yourself from the Internet, move to the North Pole and live in digital darkness for the rest of your life. Embrace the social technology that is sweeping the world today and use it to your advantage. Good luck and happy self-branding!

Sarah Fudin currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California’s Master of Arts in Teaching program, which provides aspiring teachers with the opportunity to earn a Master’s degree and teaching certificate online. Outside of work, Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt. Follow her on Twitter @sarahfudin.

   

Make a career out of people watching!

sociology-community

If you want to do something with your life that can help make a difference for others, you should think about a career in sociology. With an Associate's degree in sociology, you have different choices to make when it comes to deciding whose lives you want to study, and perhaps, change for the better.
Sociologists work in studying the scientific aspects of human behavior. Sociology involves watching how people interact with each other. It also encompasses the study of groups of people, of entire societies, and studying the differences in behavior between them. Studying people helps us to understand why we behave differently.
Sociology courses consist of teaching students about the history of sociology and how experts conduct research, surveys, and interviews, as well as how they use this information and for what purpose. With an Associate's degree in this field, you can choose to work in the study of how other people influence others around them.
You will learn about social forces that cause people to behave in certain ways. Because families are the most powerful social force we will encounter in our lives, sociologists study families and use the information to better the lives of less fortunate families. As you earn your degree, you will learn how to use scientific research to help others better themselves.
In sociology classes, students will learn to notice certain patterns that develop in social lives of people. They see patterns by interviewing people, observing people at work and play, and drawing conclusions from what they learned. Students will also learn how to ask the right questions and learn the methods used by experts to get the right answers.
The special way in which sociologists look at the social lives of humans and the tools they use in their studies is one interesting aspect of sociology. With an Associate's degree, sociology students can choose from a number of different professions to work in. It all depends on where you believe your work would benefit others the most.
You can choose to study the social lives of children and teens in youth centers or of the elderly in retirement homes. You may want to study the lives of children living in poverty or of the lives of those who are independently wealthy. If the education of our youth were of concern to you, an Associate's degree in sociology would enable you to work in schools or other centers of learning, as a teacher's assistance or a teacher's aide. If you are worried about the number of youths in detention centers, you could work as a paralegal or legal assistance. If you prefer working to help those who are sick or injured, your degree in sociology can help you secure a job as a nurse's aide or a paramedic.
When conducting your college search, consider the importance of a profession in this field. An Associate's in sociology gives students a number of options to choose from, depending on which fields they want to pursue in their professional careers. If they are willing to spend more time in school, some students may decide to go on to earn a Bachelor's or a Master's in sociology.
By Daniel Still
If you want to do something with your life that can help make a difference for others, you should think about a career in sociology. With an Associate's degree in sociology, you have different choices to make when it comes to deciding whose lives you want to study, and perhaps, change for the better.

Sociologists work in studying the scientific aspects of human behavior. Sociology involves watching how people interact with each other. It also encompasses the study of groups of people, of entire societies, and studying the differences in behavior between them. Studying people helps us to understand why we behave differently.

Sociology courses consist of teaching students about the history of sociology and how experts conduct research, surveys, and interviews, as well as how they use this information and for what purpose. With an Associate's degree in this field, you can choose to work in the study of how other people influence others around them.

You will learn about social forces that cause people to behave in certain ways. Because families are the most powerful social force we will encounter in our lives, sociologists study families and use the information to better the lives of less fortunate families. As you earn your degree, you will learn how to use scientific research to help others better themselves.

In sociology classes, students will learn to notice certain patterns that develop in social lives of people. They see patterns by interviewing people, observing people at work and play, and drawing conclusions from what they learned. Students will also learn how to ask the right questions and learn the methods used by experts to get the right answers.

The special way in which sociologists look at the social lives of humans and the tools they use in their studies is one interesting aspect of sociology. With an Associate's degree, sociology students can choose from a number of different professions to work in. It all depends on where you believe your work would benefit others the most.

You can choose to study the social lives of children and teens in youth centers or of the elderly in retirement homes. You may want to study the lives of children living in poverty or of the lives of those who are independently wealthy. If the education of our youth were of concern to you, an Associate's degree in sociology would enable you to work in schools or other centers of learning, as a teacher's assistance or a teacher's aide. If you are worried about the number of youths in detention centers, you could work as a paralegal or legal assistance. If you prefer working to help those who are sick or injured, your degree in sociology can help you secure a job as a nurse's aide or a paramedic.

When conducting your college search, consider the importance of a profession in this field. An Associate's in sociology gives students a number of options to choose from, depending on which fields they want to pursue in their professional careers. If they are willing to spend more time in school, some students may decide to go on to earn a Bachelor's or a Master's in sociology.

By Daniel Still


   

College students and grads, check out Barefoot Student

internship

From College News - If you're a student or recent grad, Barefoot Student could be your job opportunity site.
As a college student or a recent grad, no doubt you’re finding that it’s more difficult to find a job than you probably expected. With the economy in such a poor state, college students and grads are having difficulty even finding entry-level positions. You’ve probably tried craigslist, Monster and every other option that is available to you. But have you taken a chance with Barefoot Student?
Barefoot Student is “an exclusive work portal that connects entrepreneurial college students & recent grads with community members and employers.” It allows students to post their services for free and also allows them to browse jobs, gigs and internships at no cost.
Businesses can post openings for a fee, and Premium Employer Members can contact students directly.
Like craigslist, Barefoot Student allows you to browse by city and state, finding the jobs nearest to you easily. It also lets you browse by profession and area of expertise.
So what are you waiting for? Check out the job and gig site that was created just for you!
By Janelle Vreeland
From College News - If you're a student or recent grad, Barefoot Student could be your job opportunity site.

As a college student or a recent grad, no doubt you’re finding that it’s more difficult to find a job than you probably expected. With the economy in such a poor state, college students and grads are having difficulty even finding entry-level positions. You’ve probably tried craigslist, Monster and every other option that is available to you. But have you taken a chance with Barefoot Student?

Barefoot Student is “an exclusive work portal that connects entrepreneurial college students & recent grads with community members and employers.” It allows students to post their services for free and also allows them to browse jobs, gigs and internships at no cost.
Businesses can post openings for a fee, and Premium Employer Members can contact students directly.

Like craigslist, Barefoot Student allows you to browse by city and state, finding the jobs nearest to you easily. It also lets you browse by profession and area of expertise.

So what are you waiting for? Check out the job and gig site that was created just for you!

By Janelle Vreeland
   

How to ace resumes and cover letters

internship

From College News

The Resume:
We all dream of having the perfect job, one that lets us make time for family, pays well and gives us the ability to live life comfortably. Resumes can be the backbone to landing a job and are your way of showing off your skills and experience. Without a resume, you’ll be unable to prove your ability to work for the company you’re interested in. It is important to have a resume that stands out from all the others.
Focus is vital to your resume. You should state what you want to do in your career and how exactly you can make a difference to the company. Having an objective section is what will set your resume apart from those without one.
“There are alternatives to stating an objective statement but you want your resume to be a stand-alone document,” said Sandy Marcus, career and educational service leader from the Illinois Institute of Technology, “You do not want to rely on a cover letter.” If you do this then the company may not even look at your resume. You can write an objective statement that is for your benefit, what you want to get out of the company and how you will contribute and use your skills. It is much more powerful and to the point.
“You want to make the objective how you intend to help the company. For example, to increase sales, to increase market shares, to improve quality, etc. So when the company looks at this, they will see what benefit they are going to get,” Marcus continued.
“What companies tend to look for immediately are the educational background, job titles you have obtained, what kinds of degrees/certificates you have received, training and a sense of things you have accomplished,” he added. “These are all very important parts of the resume and you want to make sure they stand out somehow. Now it is up to you how you want to lay it out. Keep in mind that color and font are bold ways of showing your accomplishments, but they can be overused. You want to be careful of not falling into the trap of emphasizing everything.”
A good resume tip to follow is to have someone review your resume for thirty seconds and then ask what parts jumped out the most. This will show you if you need to change the layout or add anything else that is important. Also, it is wise to stick to one page so the company does not have to flip through numerous pages. It is okay to go a little over a page if you have quite a bit of experience, but limit yourself to two maximum.
“The biggest mistake one could make is not showing what you can do for the company,” Marcus said. “One way to approach this is stating it directly through the objective statement. Another way to show this is through your expertise. Anything that you would like to do for the company that you have accomplished somewhere else is very important. Any way that you can show how you will help the company become more successful is key.”
Companies look for qualities of energy, reliability, maturity and commitment, Marcus added. If students don’t have much work experience, they can discuss activities or volunteer work within their resume to show the company that they do obtain these qualities.
The Cover Letter:
When applying for work, it is not enough to just have a great resume; you must also have an outstanding cover letter. You’ve only got one shot to score an interview, so you need to make it count. A few simple things to keep in mind can help you craft a truly impressive cover letter format.
Cover letters tend to be about three to four paragraphs long, but should never exceed a single page. However, a one-sentence cover letter is not going to convince anyone of anything. Catherine Carrigan, Career Advisor at Loyola University Chicago’s Career Development Center, said she’s seen students come in with one-sentence letters that can send employers the wrong message.
“If it’s not focused, it’s clear you don’t know anything about the employer,” Carrigan says. “There’s nothing special about that job to you.”
Carrigan also suggests you address a specific person, rather than a generic “To Whom It May Concern.”. If the name of the person reviewing applicants is not listed, call the company office and try to find out, and don’t be discouraged if you still can’t get a name.
“If you call Human Resources and they tell you to write ‘Dear Recruiter,’ that’s what you write,” she said. “That’s a heads-up that you were one of the people who tried to use the exact language they suggested.”
Your cover letter format ought to highlight why you are the person for the job, but should not be an autobiography. According to Monster.com resume expert Kim Isaacs, making it all about you is a common mistake. Instead, highlight your experiences and skills within the framework of the goals and needs of the company and the parameters of the job position you are seeking. Research the prospective company and convince the employers that you know what they need and that you can deliver.
Don’t rush with your application; proofread everything, have another person take a glance, and let it sit overnight so you can look at it again with a fresh eye.
“An error-free cover letter that also shows some focus beyond just the home page on the company’s website will stand out by that virtue alone,” Carrigan said. “It’s not about bells and whistles. It’s about focus, enthusiasm and showing that you’re ready to start the job and make an impact.”
By Candice Silva and Kamil Zawadzki
The Resume:
We all dream of having the perfect job, one that lets us make time for family, pays well and gives us the ability to live life comfortably. Resumes can be the backbone to landing a job and are your way of showing off your skills and experience. Without a resume, you’ll be unable to prove your ability to work for the company you’re interested in. It is important to have a resume that stands out from all the others.

Focus is vital to your resume. You should state what you want to do in your career and how exactly you can make a difference to the company. Having an objective section is what will set your resume apart from those without one.

“There are alternatives to stating an objective statement but you want your resume to be a stand-alone document,” said Sandy Marcus, career and educational service leader from the Illinois Institute of Technology, “You do not want to rely on a cover letter.” If you do this then the company may not even look at your resume. You can write an objective statement that is for your benefit, what you want to get out of the company and how you will contribute and use your skills. It is much more powerful and to the point.

“You want to make the objective how you intend to help the company. For example, to increase sales, to increase market shares, to improve quality, etc. So when the company looks at this, they will see what benefit they are going to get,” Marcus continued.

“What companies tend to look for immediately are the educational background, job titles you have obtained, what kinds of degrees/certificates you have received, training and a sense of things you have accomplished,” he added. “These are all very important parts of the resume and you want to make sure they stand out somehow. Now it is up to you how you want to lay it out. Keep in mind that color and font are bold ways of showing your accomplishments, but they can be overused. You want to be careful of not falling into the trap of emphasizing everything.”

A good resume tip to follow is to have someone review your resume for thirty seconds and then ask what parts jumped out the most. This will show you if you need to change the layout or add anything else that is important. Also, it is wise to stick to one page so the company does not have to flip through numerous pages. It is okay to go a little over a page if you have quite a bit of experience, but limit yourself to two maximum.

“The biggest mistake one could make is not showing what you can do for the company,” Marcus said. “One way to approach this is stating it directly through the objective statement. Another way to show this is through your expertise. Anything that you would like to do for the company that you have accomplished somewhere else is very important. Any way that you can show how you will help the company become more successful is key.”

Companies look for qualities of energy, reliability, maturity and commitment, Marcus added. If students don’t have much work experience, they can discuss activities or volunteer work within their resume to show the company that they do obtain these qualities.

The Cover Letter:
When applying for work, it is not enough to just have a great resume; you must also have an outstanding cover letter. You’ve only got one shot to score an interview, so you need to make it count. A few simple things to keep in mind can help you craft a truly impressive cover letter format.

Cover letters tend to be about three to four paragraphs long, but should never exceed a single page. However, a one-sentence cover letter is not going to convince anyone of anything. Catherine Carrigan, Career Advisor at Loyola University Chicago’s Career Development Center, said she’s seen students come in with one-sentence letters that can send employers the wrong message.

“If it’s not focused, it’s clear you don’t know anything about the employer,” Carrigan says. “There’s nothing special about that job to you.”

Carrigan also suggests you address a specific person, rather than a generic “To Whom It May Concern.”. If the name of the person reviewing applicants is not listed, call the company office and try to find out, and don’t be discouraged if you still can’t get a name.

“If you call Human Resources and they tell you to write ‘Dear Recruiter,’ that’s what you write,” she said. “That’s a heads-up that you were one of the people who tried to use the exact language they suggested.”

Your cover letter format ought to highlight why you are the person for the job, but should not be an autobiography. According to Monster.com resume expert Kim Isaacs, making it all about you is a common mistake. Instead, highlight your experiences and skills within the framework of the goals and needs of the company and the parameters of the job position you are seeking. Research the prospective company and convince the employers that you know what they need and that you can deliver.

Don’t rush with your application; proofread everything, have another person take a glance, and let it sit overnight so you can look at it again with a fresh eye.

“An error-free cover letter that also shows some focus beyond just the home page on the company’s website will stand out by that virtue alone,” Carrigan said. “It’s not about bells and whistles. It’s about focus, enthusiasm and showing that you’re ready to start the job and make an impact.”

By Candice Silva and Kamil Zawadzki 

 

   

National Engineers Week Foundation offers new opportunities for students

From College News - The National Engineers Week Foundation is a partnership of more than 100 professional societies.

Today’s engineering students are facing the world’s most pressing challenges and force of overcome overwhelming odds. New Faces of Engineering: College Edition recognizes the accomplishments of third, fourth and fifth year engineering students and provides a opportunity for students to communicate with the Foundation and members throughout the year. The foundation is aware of the demanding obstacles students will be faced with including energy resources, infrastructure renewal and national security, which they will be asked to address and potentially solve, and helps them prepare for their future.

The National Engineers Week Foundation is the world leader in attracting and refining the next generation of engineers and celebrating the engineering profession. National Engineers Week Foundation is broadening its annual New Faces of Engineering program, which, for eight years, has honored the nation’s most promising young engineering professionals.

The National Engineers Week Foundation is a partnership of more than 100 professional societies, major corporations and government agencies. It is dedicated to ensuring a diverse and well-educated future for the engineering workforce by increasing the understanding of and interest in engineering and technological careers, according to National Engineers Week. As well as promoting pre-college literacy in math and science among students and young professionals. Engineers Week works to raise public understanding and gratitude to engineers’ assistance to society.

The College Edition application will be available August 15, 2011. The deadline for submissions is October 7 and finalists are announced on October 28. Students must also be affiliated with an engineering association.

By Brittany Lawler

   

College majors that lead to well-paid careers

jobsgrad

Are you hoping to graduate from college and be immediately able to enter a career with a high salary? This is a common desire from someone with a college degree. Instead of going to college for subjects you have an interest in, you may simply want to ensure job security and salary. There are a few promising majors that may help you accomplish this.
The top major for achieving a high salary is engineering. Again and again, these graduates are appearing at the top of the list for entry-level salaries. Out of the engineering majors, petroleum engineering ranks at the top, with salaries around $90,000 right out of college. Aerospace engineering, chemical engineering, and electrical engineering closely follow. It appears that engineering, in general, is just a very lucrative career to enter.
An interest in physics can guarantee you big bucks with a degree in it. Closely following engineering degrees, a degree in physics sends graduates into a workforce willing to pay over $50,000 from the start. In addition, this is a field that is rapidly growing, so many jobs are available. Those who enter research, development, and other important positions for physics majors can plan on doubling their pay by mid-career.
If you are good with numbers and do well in economics, a major in it might do you some good. A major in economics consistently provides graduates with salaries over $48,000. In addition, by mid-career, they could be making over $97,000. This is an enormous increase in pay, but it is possible with a degree in economics because it is very useful in both government sectors and business; both desire experts who can predict economic trends.
One great choice of major that provides not only a large entry-level salary but a huge pool of available jobs is computer science. Those with computer knowledge are highly desired due to our huge technological focus, and thus, they are paid well - often over $56,000 right after college. By the time they reach mid-career, those with computer science degrees can receive salaries well above $96,000.
Finance degrees may provide graduates with excitingly high salaries. Consider the pay for these graduates right out of college; it is $47,500. After many years in the field, these veteran experts can receive salaries nearing $91,500. These careers are frequently located in financial institutions, such as credit companies and commercial banks, and other businesses as investment managers and financial analysts.
Architecture majors are coming out ahead in salary, if not as much as engineers are, but enough to get excited about. They enter the field as architects for about $41,000 and can expect to increase their salaries over time to as high as $80,000. Employment for architects is positive right now; architects are needed to satisfy demand for "green" building, as well as the need for new structures to accommodate a growing population.
Considering the careers described, if you are concerned about pay, there are many excellent majors to choose from that will guarantee a decent salary. In fact, the six listed here are only a handful. High-paying degrees are frequent across the board for science majors, but humanities majors are on the list as well. Whether you choose to attend a traditional school or take online courses, you can earn a Bachelor degree in a field of your choice!
By Daniel Still
Are you hoping to graduate from college and be immediately able to enter a career with a high salary? This is a common desire from someone with a college degree. Instead of going to college for subjects you have an interest in, you may simply want to ensure job security and salary. There are a few promising majors that may help you accomplish this.

The top major for achieving a high salary is engineering. Again and again, these graduates are appearing at the top of the list for entry-level salaries. Out of the engineering majors, petroleum engineering ranks at the top, with salaries around $90,000 right out of college. Aerospace engineering, chemical engineering, and electrical engineering closely follow. It appears that engineering, in general, is just a very lucrative career to enter.

An interest in physics can guarantee you big bucks with a degree in it. Closely following engineering degrees, a degree in physics sends graduates into a workforce willing to pay over $50,000 from the start. In addition, this is a field that is rapidly growing, so many jobs are available. Those who enter research, development, and other important positions for physics majors can plan on doubling their pay by mid-career.

If you are good with numbers and do well in economics, a major in it might do you some good. A major in economics consistently provides graduates with salaries over $48,000. In addition, by mid-career, they could be making over $97,000. This is an enormous increase in pay, but it is possible with a degree in economics because it is very useful in both government sectors and business; both desire experts who can predict economic trends.

One great choice of major that provides not only a large entry-level salary but a huge pool of available jobs is computer science. Those with computer knowledge are highly desired due to our huge technological focus, and thus, they are paid well - often over $56,000 right after college. By the time they reach mid-career, those with computer science degrees can receive salaries well above $96,000.

Finance degrees may provide graduates with excitingly high salaries. Consider the pay for these graduates right out of college; it is $47,500. After many years in the field, these veteran experts can receive salaries nearing $91,500. These careers are frequently located in financial institutions, such as credit companies and commercial banks, and other businesses as investment managers and financial analysts.

Architecture majors are coming out ahead in salary, if not as much as engineers are, but enough to get excited about. They enter the field as architects for about $41,000 and can expect to increase their salaries over time to as high as $80,000. Employment for architects is positive right now; architects are needed to satisfy demand for "green" building, as well as the need for new structures to accommodate a growing population.

Considering the careers described, if you are concerned about pay, there are many excellent majors to choose from that will guarantee a decent salary. In fact, the six listed here are only a handful. High-paying degrees are frequent across the board for science majors, but humanities majors are on the list as well. Whether you choose to attend a traditional school or take online courses, you can earn a Bachelor degree in a field of your choice!

By Daniel Still
   

Graduating soon?

jobsgrad

From College New - Here’s how to land your first job.
A version of this article appears in the latest issue of College News magazine.
Graduation is near for many students and finding a “real job” will prove to be the ultimate final exam. Your job search should be given the same amount of attention and importance as any other college project you’ve had, if not more. Ultimately, you want your first job out of college to reflect all the hard work you’ve put into getting a degree. With this tough economy, your skills will definitely be put to the test. Here are nine sure-fire ways to make your job search easier according to Samantha Tringali-Howie, a recruiter at Maximum Management, a recruiting firm specializing in human resources placement in New York.
Focus Your Resume. It’s very likely that your resume will receive a 15-second glance before a recruiter or hiring manger decides whether or not to move forward. That means everything on there should be relevant, accurate and place you in the best light. Target your resume to your ideal job with a profile summary or a list of qualifications. Be sure to update and edit your resume regularly, adding any new skills you’ve learned. Did you just receive a certification or learn a new software program? Add it to your resume. Having a generic template on hand is a good idea, but make sure to customize it for each specific job.
Target your ideal company. Smart house hunters start their search with a list of must-haves in their ideal home or at least the closest thing they can get to their ideal home.  They have a preferred number of bedrooms and bathrooms, square footage and neighborhoods in mind before they start looking. You should do the same with your job search. What kind of company do you want to work for? A Fortune 500? A non-profit? Think about what you’d like in an employer and target your job search with those factors in mind. You may be willing to take anything you can get early in your career, but as your career develops and you sharpen your skills, your “must-haves” will be more defined and you’ll be closer to your dream job.
Network, Network, Network. Don’t let the idea of networking intimidate you. “It’s important to know that networking is a way to develop leads, enrich your subject knowledge, and in the long-term, build relationships that can lead to a great role,” Tringali-Howie said. “The challenge, especially for younger generations, is to grasp that networking is a long process. It doesn’t always provide the instant gratification pervasive in today’s culture.” Networking allows you to stay on top of who’s hiring and have a “pulse” on what’s going on in your industry. Building your professional contacts will always benefit your career.
Work with your career center. Your school’s career center can play a helpful role in helping you find jobs as well as sharpening your interviewing skills. Many career centers conduct mock interviews with students where you can role-play with a counselor who can guide you and provide feedback. Career counselors can connect you with alumni who are in your desired field and willing to act as mentors to recent graduates. Many times, career centers get their job leads through alumni and counselors can have a better understanding of what the employer is looking for in an ideal candidate. Career centers are also another great way to build your network.
Social media. Websites such as LinkedIn and Twitter are excellent ways to search for jobs.  “They are hugely important to today’s job seeker because most recruiters are sourcing more heavily from them rather than from job boards,” Tringali-Howie said. “Be sure to craft a profile with impact; include a brief description of both your broad knowledge and areas of expertise, or in the case of a new grad, your goals and internships you’ve had. Add keywords that will lead recruiters to you (i.e. if you are seeking a human resources internship, you’ll want to include these words in your profile).” Many recent grads have been contacted for job interviews via social media by recruiters who have seen their profiles and taken an interest.
Tringali-Howie also advises, “you should know however, that social media is a double-edged sword. While it’s an important tool, remember that it is also a way for recruiters to find information that could eliminate you. Complaining in your blog about your last boss?  Not a good idea.  Posting sassy images on your public Facebook page from your last ladies night out? Another no-no, you get the drift.  So watch your online presence carefully, regard it as your personal brand and make sure that all public content is 100 percent professional and puts forth your very best self.”
Expand your search. Job boards like Monster and Career Builder are great for perusing job postings but they are very generalized and everyone else is looking there too. Many available and competitive jobs are not advertised on these sites. Try niche sites for your specific industry. For example, search PharmaDiversityJobBoard.com for pharmaceutical jobs and MediaBistro.com for jobs in media and public relations. Get familiar with the different job boards in your industry and you’ll be 10 steps ahead of the already competitive job market.
Set realistic expectations. Job hunting for your first real job after college is a daunting task, so give yourself a realistic deadline for when you expect to have a job. Don’t beat yourself up if you’re not finding anything. The important thing is that you stay productive every day, whether it’s sending resumes, updating profile information or making some calls. By doing this you’re staying active and more importantly, you’re putting your name out there consistently.
Keep In Touch. After graduation you’ll keep in contact with all your friends, right? But what about the college itself? Be sure to sign up to your school’s newsletter to keep on top of what other students and alumni are doing and where they’re working. You never know where fellow classmates may end up; they just might be the contact you need to get your foot in the door at a major company. More than likely, they are happy to help fellow alumni advance in their career.
By Angelica Rodriguez
From College News - Here’s how to land your first job.

A version of this article appears in the latest issue of College News magazine.

Graduation is near for many students and finding a “real job” will prove to be the ultimate final exam. Your job search should be given the same amount of attention and importance as any other college project you’ve had, if not more. Ultimately, you want your first job out of college to reflect all the hard work you’ve put into getting a degree. With this tough economy, your skills will definitely be put to the test. Here are nine sure-fire ways to make your job search easier according to Samantha Tringali-Howie, a recruiter at Maximum Management, a recruiting firm specializing in human resources placement in New York.

Focus Your Resume. It’s very likely that your resume will receive a 15-second glance before a recruiter or hiring manger decides whether or not to move forward. That means everything on there should be relevant, accurate and place you in the best light. Target your resume to your ideal job with a profile summary or a list of qualifications. Be sure to update and edit your resume regularly, adding any new skills you’ve learned. Did you just receive a certification or learn a new software program? Add it to your resume. Having a generic template on hand is a good idea, but make sure to customize it for each specific job.

Target your ideal company. Smart house hunters start their search with a list of must-haves in their ideal home or at least the closest thing they can get to their ideal home.  They have a preferred number of bedrooms and bathrooms, square footage and neighborhoods in mind before they start looking. You should do the same with your job search. What kind of company do you want to work for? A Fortune 500? A non-profit? Think about what you’d like in an employer and target your job search with those factors in mind. You may be willing to take anything you can get early in your career, but as your career develops and you sharpen your skills, your “must-haves” will be more defined and you’ll be closer to your dream job.

Network, Network, Network. Don’t let the idea of networking intimidate you. “It’s important to know that networking is a way to develop leads, enrich your subject knowledge, and in the long-term, build relationships that can lead to a great role,” Tringali-Howie said. “The challenge, especially for younger generations, is to grasp that networking is a long process. It doesn’t always provide the instant gratification pervasive in today’s culture.” Networking allows you to stay on top of who’s hiring and have a “pulse” on what’s going on in your industry. Building your professional contacts will always benefit your career.

Work with your career center. Your school’s career center can play a helpful role in helping you find jobs as well as sharpening your interviewing skills. Many career centers conduct mock interviews with students where you can role-play with a counselor who can guide you and provide feedback. Career counselors can connect you with alumni who are in your desired field and willing to act as mentors to recent graduates. Many times, career centers get their job leads through alumni and counselors can have a better understanding of what the employer is looking for in an ideal candidate. Career centers are also another great way to build your network.

Social media. Websites such as LinkedIn and Twitter are excellent ways to search for jobs.  “They are hugely important to today’s job seeker because most recruiters are sourcing more heavily from them rather than from job boards,” Tringali-Howie said. “Be sure to craft a profile with impact; include a brief description of both your broad knowledge and areas of expertise, or in the case of a new grad, your goals and internships you’ve had. Add keywords that will lead recruiters to you (i.e. if you are seeking a human resources internship, you’ll want to include these words in your profile).” Many recent grads have been contacted for job interviews via social media by recruiters who have seen their profiles and taken an interest.
Tringali-Howie also advises, “you should know however, that social media is a double-edged sword. While it’s an important tool, remember that it is also a way for recruiters to find information that could eliminate you. Complaining in your blog about your last boss?  Not a good idea.  Posting sassy images on your public Facebook page from your last ladies night out? Another no-no, you get the drift.  So watch your online presence carefully, regard it as your personal brand and make sure that all public content is 100 percent professional and puts forth your very best self.”

Expand your search. Job boards like Monster and Career Builder are great for perusing job postings but they are very generalized and everyone else is looking there too. Many available and competitive jobs are not advertised on these sites. Try niche sites for your specific industry. For example, search PharmaDiversityJobBoard.com for pharmaceutical jobs and MediaBistro.com for jobs in media and public relations. Get familiar with the different job boards in your industry and you’ll be 10 steps ahead of the already competitive job market.

Set realistic expectations. Job hunting for your first real job after college is a daunting task, so give yourself a realistic deadline for when you expect to have a job. Don’t beat yourself up if you’re not finding anything. The important thing is that you stay productive every day, whether it’s sending resumes, updating profile information or making some calls. By doing this you’re staying active and more importantly, you’re putting your name out there consistently.

Keep In Touch. After graduation you’ll keep in contact with all your friends, right? But what about the college itself? Be sure to sign up to your school’s newsletter to keep on top of what other students and alumni are doing and where they’re working. You never know where fellow classmates may end up; they just might be the contact you need to get your foot in the door at a major company. More than likely, they are happy to help fellow alumni advance in their career. 

By Angelica Rodriguez
   

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