Careers

Top 5 professional fields that offer high-earning jobs

jobsgrad

With the emergence of online bachelor programs, getting good education has never been easier. There are tons of bachelor degrees that you can take out there. You might be trying to figure out which online degree you should take. If you want to get employed after college, you should think of a profession that is in demand. The following are the top fields to consider if you want to earn a lot of money:
• Nursing - There are so many job opportunities waiting for registered nurses. Nurses are in demand in various parts of the world. The good thing about being a registered nurse is that you can earn a lot of money. In the United States, registered nurses earn about forty to seventy thousand dollars a year. Online nursing programs focus on applied and basic nursing research. Topics include Medical Surgical Nursing, Pediatric Nursing, Nursing Management, and a whole lot more.
• Computer Science - The need for computer experts is rising very fast. Almost every business company out there needs teams of computer experts for their technical needs. IT infrastructures have to be maintained regularly by very skilled computer experts. Aside from hardware maintenance, there are also a lot of job opportunities out there for website designers and developers. Companies have expanded their markets to the online world and that is why they will need professionals who can help them provide the best services to their clients.
• Education - Education is a very important field for your consideration. There will always be a need for teachers who excel in various disciplines. If you are skilled in dealing with kids, you can teach at pre-schools or even in middle schools. If you think you can teach complicated subjects such as trigonometry, physics, or calculus, you can always consider teaching in high school. Recently, the demand for special education teachers has risen. That is why numerous special education programs are being made available to aspiring teachers. Experts say that the demand for special education teachers will dramatically rise in the following years.
• Psychology - Psychologist are among the highest earning professionals in the world. In fact, some psychologists even earn more than doctors and engineers. In the United States, the median salary for psychologists is seventy-seven thousand dollars. You should consider taking a career in psychology if you are skilled in helping with other people and their problems. Psychologists work in hospitals and other health establishments. You can also set up a clinic of your own.
• Law - When you become a lawyer, you do not really have to look for clients since clients will be looking for you. You can choose a particular field to excel in. For example, you can focus on family law so that you will be dealing with various issues such as divorce and child custody. You can also focus on criminal law especially if you have very good investigative skills. There are so many people out there who need legal services. That is why a lot of high school graduates consider being lawyers one day.
Looking to earn an online degree? Take a look at this site to get started!
By Jeremy Leith
With the emergence of online bachelor programs, getting good education has never been easier. There are tons of bachelor degrees that you can take out there. You might be trying to figure out which online degree you should take. If you want to get employed after college, you should think of a profession that is in demand. The following are the top fields to consider if you want to earn a lot of money:

Nursing - There are so many job opportunities waiting for registered nurses. Nurses are in demand in various parts of the world. The good thing about being a registered nurse is that you can earn a lot of money. In the United States, registered nurses earn about forty to seventy thousand dollars a year. Online nursing programs focus on applied and basic nursing research. Topics include Medical Surgical Nursing, Pediatric Nursing, Nursing Management, and a whole lot more.

• Computer Science - The need for computer experts is rising very fast. Almost every business company out there needs teams of computer experts for their technical needs. IT infrastructures have to be maintained regularly by very skilled computer experts. Aside from hardware maintenance, there are also a lot of job opportunities out there for website designers and developers. Companies have expanded their markets to the online world and that is why they will need professionals who can help them provide the best services to their clients.

Education - Education is a very important field for your consideration. There will always be a need for teachers who excel in various disciplines. If you are skilled in dealing with kids, you can teach at pre-schools or even in middle schools. If you think you can teach complicated subjects such as trigonometry, physics, or calculus, you can always consider teaching in high school. Recently, the demand for special education teachers has risen. That is why numerous special education programs are being made available to aspiring teachers. Experts say that the demand for special education teachers will dramatically rise in the following years.

Psychology - Psychologist are among the highest earning professionals in the world. In fact, some psychologists even earn more than doctors and engineers. In the United States, the median salary for psychologists is seventy-seven thousand dollars. You should consider taking a career in psychology if you are skilled in helping with other people and their problems. Psychologists work in hospitals and other health establishments. You can also set up a clinic of your own.

Law - When you become a lawyer, you do not really have to look for clients since clients will be looking for you. You can choose a particular field to excel in. For example, you can focus on family law so that you will be dealing with various issues such as divorce and child custody. You can also focus on criminal law especially if you have very good investigative skills. There are so many people out there who need legal services. That is why a lot of high school graduates consider being lawyers one day.

Looking to earn an online degree? Take a look at this site to get started!

By Jeremy Leith
   

Best paying jobs for women

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With more and more women opting to go out and build careers for themselves, there are a number of jobs that the market has to offer to women, which come with its own set of glamour and prestige. Having said that, with women competing with men in an equal playing ground they are also expected to prove their worth with the strong backup of a good academic background. Women also need to make the same effort with respect to self-discovery, planning and hard work to make a mark in the industry.
Planning your Career Correctly
Most employers are of the belief that the most practical thing to do for women to while they are planning their careers is the compare the return on investment of their education with the potential salary they are bound to make through their profession.
According to statistics, some of the most popular and high paying job options for women belong in the education, IT, Finance, HR, Aviation, Medical and Real Estate sector.
Consequently, it is important to remember that each one of these professions have its own set of unique benefits and drawbacks. For example, not matter how high paying a flight attendant's salary is, and no matter how glamorous the job, the excessive travel and erratic work hours aren't necessarily every woman's cup of tea.
What must a Woman look for in her Career
As a woman, one is expected to fulfil a number of other social demands as compared to a man. Hence, no matter how rewarding the salary, it is important for a woman to find professional stability out of the long-term discipline that they pick without compromising o their sense of personal achievement.
Here is a list of some of the most viable professional choices for women -
1. Even though becoming a pharmacist takes up to 6 years in most countries, the remuneration at the end of the day is more than satisfactory. With the rampant growth of the industry on the whole, this profession is by far considered to be among the best paying careers for women today. The starting salary of a pharmacist is believed to be around hundred thousand Canadian dollars a year. The need for more medication among the baby boomers that are now nearing old age, the potential of this industry is nowhere close to dwindling.
2. Some women are natural with money matters, and are great with giving advice with respect to effective management of monies. Financial management, consulting and advisory services make for another great prospective career for the new age career women. With the erratic economies, institutions and individuals alike are all on a look out for competent financial planners. This career also promises a six figure salary to women with appropriate certification in accountancy and financial planning.
3. Human resources management also poses its own set of interesting potential in the area of recruitments, training, counselling, conflict management and payroll management. With a thousand facets to look into, this profession is highly demanding especially for women who are good with people management and communications.
In addition to this, considering the personality type of most women they are able to fulfil the needs of certain jobs a lot better than their male counterparts. For examples, female psychologists, market research, and a number of sales jobs are better handled by women.
By Stella R Richard - a recognized for its high educational quality standards, and expert in Flight Attendant Salary, Hospitality Management, Travel & Tourism in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
With more and more women opting to go out and build careers for themselves, there are a number of jobs that the market has to offer to women, which come with its own set of glamour and prestige. Having said that, with women competing with men in an equal playing ground they are also expected to prove their worth with the strong backup of a good academic background. Women also need to make the same effort with respect to self-discovery, planning and hard work to make a mark in the industry.

Planning your Career Correctly
Most employers are of the belief that the most practical thing to do for women to while they are planning their careers is the compare the return on investment of their education with the potential salary they are bound to make through their profession.

According to statistics, some of the most popular and high paying job options for women belong in the education, IT, Finance, HR, Aviation, Medical and Real Estate sector.

Consequently, it is important to remember that each one of these professions have its own set of unique benefits and drawbacks. For example, not matter how high paying a flight attendant's salary is, and no matter how glamorous the job, the excessive travel and erratic work hours aren't necessarily every woman's cup of tea.

What must a Woman look for in her Career
As a woman, one is expected to fulfil a number of other social demands as compared to a man. Hence, no matter how rewarding the salary, it is important for a woman to find professional stability out of the long-term discipline that they pick without compromising o their sense of personal achievement.

Here is a list of some of the most viable professional choices for women -
1. Even though becoming a pharmacist takes up to 6 years in most countries, the remuneration at the end of the day is more than satisfactory. With the rampant growth of the industry on the whole, this profession is by far considered to be among the best paying careers for women today. The starting salary of a pharmacist is believed to be around hundred thousand Canadian dollars a year. The need for more medication among the baby boomers that are now nearing old age, the potential of this industry is nowhere close to dwindling.

2. Some women are natural with money matters, and are great with giving advice with respect to effective management of monies. Financial management, consulting and advisory services make for another great prospective career for the new age career women. With the erratic economies, institutions and individuals alike are all on a look out for competent financial planners. This career also promises a six figure salary to women with appropriate certification in accountancy and financial planning.

3. Human resources management also poses its own set of interesting potential in the area of recruitments, training, counselling, conflict management and payroll management. With a thousand facets to look into, this profession is highly demanding especially for women who are good with people management and communications.

In addition to this, considering the personality type of most women they are able to fulfil the needs of certain jobs a lot better than their male counterparts. For examples, female psychologists, market research, and a number of sales jobs are better handled by women.

By Stella R Richard - a recognized for its high educational quality standards, and expert in Flight Attendant Salary, Hospitality Management, Travel & Tourism in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
   

Does your job search outcome matter to you?

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With regard to your college years, what matters to you? This is a simple question that has a very important impact on each student's likelihood of finding employment success. Like the rest of us, students cannot do everything. They have to select the things that matter most and do their best to make those things have positive outcomes.
"If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams,
and endeavors to live the life which he had imagined, he
will meet with a success unexpected in common hours."
-- Henry David Thoreau
If finding a good job at graduation is important to you, there are things that you should be doing. What are the job search preparation goals that should matter most to you?
1. Achieving Grades that will Attract Employers - Many employers use your grades as an initial screening device. If you do not achieve their minimum requirement, they will not consider you for employment. Do you know the minimum grade requirements of your target employers? When students know the grade requirements of their target employers, grades will take on a new level of importance.
2. Obtaining and Holding a Part-Time Job - Part-time jobs are held by nearly a third of all students. Many students work because they need the money to help offset some of their college and living expenses. Other students work because they want to obtain some job-related experience. In both cases, on-the-job experience with examples and stories about their successes and accomplishments can impress potential employers. Part-time jobs also present research, creativity, problem-solving and leadership opportunities, exactly the things that employers value.
3. Obtaining some Job-Related Experience - When students know the type of job they will seek at graduation, it makes sense to find a way to gain some experience in that work. Part-time, summer and volunteer work, as well as laboratories, projects and classroom demonstrations in their field of study will usually translate into valuable and useful experiences that students can talk about and present on their resumés.
4. Gaining the Knowledge and Skills that Employers Need, Want and Expect - More than anything else, employers want knowledgeable, high energy communicators and people who can get things done well, even in the face of obstacles. That means that they want students who can talk about and provide examples of their accomplishments, experiences and successes in their campus, work and community activities.
5. Identifying Potential Employers - When students are ready to begin their job search, it is helpful to have a list of employers that have previously been researched and meet their requirements. Without a list of potential employers, students will be left to chase after only those few employers that become known to them in the coming months. Wise students take the time to identify potential employers before they are needed.
6. Preparing to Conduct an Effective Job Search - Most students do not know how to conduct an effective job search. The best candidates understand that what they do during the first three years of college will determine their success or failure in the job market. There are many things that students should be doing early on in order to offer the credentials, accomplishments and presentations that will impress target employers. The best candidates find out what is needed and take the time to get well prepared.
7. Building Relationships with Potential References - When employers check references, they want to speak with people who know the student well, have a good handle on their personality, accomplishments and capabilities and are willing to speak honestly about their performance, abilities and potential. Those relationships cannot be formed casually.
Success can be achieved
one, two, three
when you believe the words
"This matters to me."
These seven points are possible for most college students. The only question is whether a student has the resolve to learn about them and make them happen. When we believe that something is important to us, we:
- Learn more about it
- Pay close attention to it
- Devote more time and effort to the way it is done
- Overcome the difficulties
- Care about the quality of the outcome
Effective preparation for the senior year job search is hard work. However, it is extremely important. When students believe that their job search outcome is directly related to the quality and quantity of their preparation and consciously strive to address the seven points listed above, they will dramatically increase their chances for job hunting success. Does your job search outcome matter to you?
Bob Roth, a former campus recruiter, is the author of four books: The College Student's Companion, College Success: Advice for Parents of High School and College Students, The College Student's Guide To Landing A Great Job -and- The 4 Realities Of Success During and After College. Known as The "College & Career Success" Coach, Bob writes articles for College Career Services Offices, Campus Newspapers, Parent Associations and Employment Web Sites. Bob has created The Job Identification Machine a system that colleges use to identify thousands of employment opportunities for students. He has been interviewed on numerous radio programs across the country and by many publications, including U.S. News & World Report and The Wall Street Journal. http://www.The4Realities.com. Bob's Blog- http://collegesuccess.blog.com
With regard to your college years, what matters to you? This is a simple question that has a very important impact on each student's likelihood of finding employment success. Like the rest of us, students cannot do everything. They have to select the things that matter most and do their best to make those things have positive outcomes.

"If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he had imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours." -- Henry David Thoreau

If finding a good job at graduation is important to you, there are things that you should be doing. What are the job search preparation goals that should matter most to you?

1. Achieving Grades that will Attract Employers - Many employers use your grades as an initial screening device. If you do not achieve their minimum requirement, they will not consider you for employment. Do you know the minimum grade requirements of your target employers? When students know the grade requirements of their target employers, grades will take on a new level of importance.

2. Obtaining and Holding a Part-Time Job - Part-time jobs are held by nearly a third of all students. Many students work because they need the money to help offset some of their college and living expenses. Other students work because they want to obtain some job-related experience. In both cases, on-the-job experience with examples and stories about their successes and accomplishments can impress potential employers. Part-time jobs also present research, creativity, problem-solving and leadership opportunities, exactly the things that employers value.

3. Obtaining some Job-Related Experience - When students know the type of job they will seek at graduation, it makes sense to find a way to gain some experience in that work. Part-time, summer and volunteer work, as well as laboratories, projects and classroom demonstrations in their field of study will usually translate into valuable and useful experiences that students can talk about and present on their resumés.

4. Gaining the Knowledge and Skills that Employers Need, Want and Expect - More than anything else, employers want knowledgeable, high energy communicators and people who can get things done well, even in the face of obstacles. That means that they want students who can talk about and provide examples of their accomplishments, experiences and successes in their campus, work and community activities.

5. Identifying Potential Employers - When students are ready to begin their job search, it is helpful to have a list of employers that have previously been researched and meet their requirements. Without a list of potential employers, students will be left to chase after only those few employers that become known to them in the coming months. Wise students take the time to identify potential employers before they are needed.

6. Preparing to Conduct an Effective Job Search - Most students do not know how to conduct an effective job search. The best candidates understand that what they do during the first three years of college will determine their success or failure in the job market. There are many things that students should be doing early on in order to offer the credentials, accomplishments and presentations that will impress target employers. The best candidates find out what is needed and take the time to get well prepared.

7. Building Relationships with Potential References - When employers check references, they want to speak with people who know the student well, have a good handle on their personality, accomplishments and capabilities and are willing to speak honestly about their performance, abilities and potential. Those relationships cannot be formed casually.
Success can be achieved one, two, three when you believe the words "This matters to me."

These seven points are possible for most college students. The only question is whether a student has the resolve to learn about them and make them happen. When we believe that something is important to us, we:
- Learn more about it - Pay close attention to it - Devote more time and effort to the way it is done - Overcome the difficulties - Care about the quality of the outcome

Effective preparation for the senior year job search is hard work. However, it is extremely important. When students believe that their job search outcome is directly related to the quality and quantity of their preparation and consciously strive to address the seven points listed above, they will dramatically increase their chances for job hunting success. Does your job search outcome matter to you?

Bob Roth, a former campus recruiter, is the author of four books: The College Student's Companion, College Success: Advice for Parents of High School and College Students, The College Student's Guide To Landing A Great Job -and- The 4 Realities Of Success During and After College. Known as The "College & Career Success" Coach, Bob writes articles for College Career Services Offices, Campus Newspapers, Parent Associations and Employment Web Sites. Bob has created The Job Identification Machine a system that colleges use to identify thousands of employment opportunities for students. He has been interviewed on numerous radio programs across the country and by many publications, including U.S. News & World Report and The Wall Street Journal. http://www.The4Realities.com. Bob's Blog- http://collegesuccess.blog.com
   

16 career clusters - less is more

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Career clusters are as the name suggests sets of related professional fields that are in a group together. It helps to attain the knowledge and expertise needed to follow a specific career path. It also provides a background to explore several other careers in the related fields of a cluster. The Education department of the United States has formulated 16 such clusters for the benefit of the students. This has been done to simplify the grouped fields to a countable number.
The 16 career clusters are:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources: The setting up, execution, manufacture and making, management, processing, advertising of agricultural merchandise and resources comprising food products and processing, plants, animals and their products, fibre, environment systems, agribusiness, etc. This cluster provides all the knowledge and skills required to start a career in these fields and new ones related to it.
Architecture and Construction: Individuals with knowledge in this cluster work on designing, constructing, restoring, repairing, and maintaining buildings. It includes professions from architects to plumbers and electricians.
Arts, AV Technologies and Communication: Every field related to the audio-visual industry is included here. Design, production, execution, performance, journalism, etc are part of this cluster.
Business Management & Administration: All professions related to planning, implementation, building, managing staff (HR), administration, etc for running a successful business venture.
Education & Training: Occupations related to education sector from teaching to corporate training is included here.
Finance: Banking, insurance, Accounts, investments, securities, etc comprise this cluster.
Governance and Public Administration: This cluster included everything related to the smooth running of a government like defence, external affairs, taxation and income, regulations, guidelines and general public administration.
Health Science: Strategies, health policies, execution, managing health services like diagnosis, treatment or therapeutics, research and development on biotechnology, etc.
Hospitality and Tourism: Planning, managing hotels, lodges, travel, tourism, restaurants (food and beverages), resorts, recreational and amusement parks, etc.
Human Services: Everything related to individual care both physical and mental, family welfare, and community care and consumer services.
Information Technology: This cluster comprises of courses in professions related to hardware and software management including planning, execution, development, all web and digital related, networking, etc.
Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security: All the services that are related to the law and order of a place, legal, protection, corrections etc is included here.
Manufacturing: This cluster is very skill oriented one. It comprises of professions related to producing merchandise. Planning and control of production, engineering, maintenance, etc are included here.
Marketing: Advertising in different forms, sales, buying of products, their packaging and transportation, e- marketing, distribution, etc are the related fields in this cluster.
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Along with planning and execution of science and technology projects, this cluster also includes research and development in the fields. From a biologist, mathematician to an oceanographer all the professions are included here.
Transportation, Distribution & Logistics: This cluster comprises of moving merchandise from one place to another. It includes all planning, execution and delivery through transportation and logistics. It also includes the distribution and maintenance, sales, warehousing, etc.
The best part of these clusters is that it has tried to encompass within them almost all the occupations that can be thought of right from the entry-level. It is very helpful to the students who can choose a cluster of interest and later specialise in the field they choose. By reducing the number of choice from hundreds to just 16 by grouping them strategically, it had made the choice of a professional course easier.
By Vikram A Khanna
Career clusters are as the name suggests sets of related professional fields that are in a group together. It helps to attain the knowledge and expertise needed to follow a specific career path. It also provides a background to explore several other careers in the related fields of a cluster. The Education department of the United States has formulated 16 such clusters for the benefit of the students. This has been done to simplify the grouped fields to a countable number.

The 16 career clusters are:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources: The setting up, execution, manufacture and making, management, processing, advertising of agricultural merchandise and resources comprising food products and processing, plants, animals and their products, fibre, environment systems, agribusiness, etc. This cluster provides all the knowledge and skills required to start a career in these fields and new ones related to it.
Architecture and Construction: Individuals with knowledge in this cluster work on designing, constructing, restoring, repairing, and maintaining buildings. It includes professions from architects to plumbers and electricians.

Arts, AV Technologies and Communication: Every field related to the audio-visual industry is included here. Design, production, execution, performance, journalism, etc are part of this cluster.
Business Management & Administration: All professions related to planning, implementation, building, managing staff (HR), administration, etc for running a successful business venture.
Education & Training: Occupations related to education sector from teaching to corporate training is included here.

Finance: Banking, insurance, Accounts, investments, securities, etc comprise this cluster.

Governance and Public Administration: This cluster included everything related to the smooth running of a government like defence, external affairs, taxation and income, regulations, guidelines and general public administration.

Health Science: Strategies, health policies, execution, managing health services like diagnosis, treatment or therapeutics, research and development on biotechnology, etc.

Hospitality and Tourism: Planning, managing hotels, lodges, travel, tourism, restaurants (food and beverages), resorts, recreational and amusement parks, etc. Human Services: Everything related to individual care both physical and mental, family welfare, and community care and consumer services.

Information Technology: This cluster comprises of courses in professions related to hardware and software management including planning, execution, development, all web and digital related, networking, etc.

Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security: All the services that are related to the law and order of a place, legal, protection, corrections etc is included here.

Manufacturing: This cluster is very skill oriented one. It comprises of professions related to producing merchandise. Planning and control of production, engineering, maintenance, etc are included here.
Marketing: Advertising in different forms, sales, buying of products, their packaging and transportation, e- marketing, distribution, etc are the related fields in this cluster.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Along with planning and execution of science and technology projects, this cluster also includes research and development in the fields. From a biologist, mathematician to an oceanographer all the professions are included here.

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics: This cluster comprises of moving merchandise from one place to another. It includes all planning, execution and delivery through transportation and logistics. It also includes the distribution and maintenance, sales, warehousing, etc.

The best part of these clusters is that it has tried to encompass within them almost all the occupations that can be thought of right from the entry-level. It is very helpful to the students who can choose a cluster of interest and later specialise in the field they choose. By reducing the number of choice from hundreds to just 16 by grouping them strategically, it had made the choice of a professional course easier.

By Vikram A Khanna
   

Cover letters can make or break your job search success

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From College News -
The job hunt is similar to a three-course meal. Your resume cover letter is the appetizer—great on its own, but designed to make a potential employer's mouth water in anticipation of the main course. Your resume is the main dish—full of meaty, satiating information. And the dessert—the sweet part—is getting the job.
In this case, the appetizer might be the most important part of the meal. Paired with a solid resume, a strong resume cover letter can make you stand out in a pool of job applicants, whereas a weak resume cover letter can land you in an employer’s discard pile.
What is a Resume Cover Letter?
A resume cover letter is your opportunity to explain to the employer why you would be a good fit for the job opening. A resume cover letter is usually no more than three to four paragraphs long, and it fleshes out the skills and experiences displayed on your resume.
Structure of a Resume Cover Letter
Here is a basic outline for a good resume cover letter:
Your Name
Your Address
Employer’s Name
Employer’s Address
Date
Dear (Employer’s Name),
Paragraph One: The Intro
The first sentence is the most important in the whole resume cover letter because it is your hook. Write something that will make the potential employer want to read further, and try to connect the sentence to the position for which you are applying. For example, if you’re applying to a teaching position, say something about how you’re passionate about working with kids, as demonstrated by your three years of teaching experience and volunteer work. Then use the rest of the paragraph to summarize; your employer should be able to read your first paragraph and get all the important points you want to include in your cover letter.
Paragraph Two/Three: The Nitty Gritty
This is the place to expand on the skills and experiences listed in your resume. (Even if you worked in the lowest position on the totem pole, you still gained valuable experiences that you can apply to other jobs!) But be sure not to simply parrot what’s on your resume; tell the employer how the skills and experiences you’ve developed will make you successful in this position. For example, if your resume says you “interacted with customers and answered inquiries,” then your cover letter should say that your “daily interaction with customers has developed excellent customer service and communication skills.” Three skills that all employers look for in a potential employee: organizational skills, communication skills, and interpersonal skills.
These paragraphs are also a good spot to explain any gaps in your resume or things you didn’t have room for. If you’ve been unemployed, you can point out how you've been productive in the meantime. If you didn’t have room for certain activities or experience that you feel are relevant to the job description, then use this space to address them.
Paragraph Four: Wrap it up with some action
By now you should be done with the substance of your letter and it should fill about three-quarters of the page. Paragraph four simply exists to thank the employer for his/her time and inform them that you will be in touch. Unless the job posting says not to contact the company, tell the potential employer that you will follow up with them in 1-2 weeks. Be sure to include your contact information in case they want to get in touch with you sooner.
Sincerely,
(Your Name)
What Sets Your Cover Letter Apart?
Employers can get hundreds of resumes and cover letters for a single job posting, so what will make yours stand out? One way is to show that you’ve done your research on the company. Recruiters can see right away if your cover letter is cookie-cutter. You’ll have an advantage if you show that you’re aware of the company’s presence in current news and that your hopes and dreams align with their mission and goals.
Another advantage is if your cover letter is well-written and uses impeccable grammar. Employers judge your communication skills and professionalism by your cover letter, and no one wants to hire an employee who will send out sloppy communications to their clients. Even if someone is well-qualified for a position, his cover letter might go straight into the dustbin if his writing is garbage. So save yourself the hour or so that it took you to write the cover letter by taking 15 minutes to proof-read it.
When Do/Don’t I Send a Cover Letter?
According to an article on msn.com, a recent OfficeTeam survey reported that “86 percent of executives thought cover letters were a valuable resource in the hiring process.” Therefore, unless the job description specifically requests you not to send a cover letter, you should send one. However, there are a few industries that don’t require cover letters, like IT positions or part-time jobs. But it never hurts to include a cover letter; in fact, if the letter is good, your potential employer should be impressed with your effort.
How Do I Send a Cover Letter?
These days, applying to jobs has moved to almost 100% online, whether through online job forms or through e-mail. Many online job applications ask you to cut and paste your cover letter or to upload your cover letter as a .doc or .pdf file. Just make sure that the formatting of your cover letter is basic (think 12pt Times New Roman font in a Word document), so that things don’t go awry when your potential employer tries to open your file.
When applying to a job through e-mail, you have two choices as to how to present your cover letter. On the one hand, you can make the cover letter the body of your e-mail, and you can mention in Paragraph Four that you’ve attached your resume to the e-mail. On the other hand, you can write a quick blurb to the employer summarizing your cover letter (not more than 3-4 sentences), reiterate your contact information, and point out that you’ve included your cover letter and e-mail as an attachment. When saving your cover letter file for later uploading/attaching, make sure you give it an easily recognizable file name, like “Cover Letter for John Doe.” That way your potential employer will remember who that wonderful person was that they were going to call for an interview.
Bon Appetit
As with preparing any scrumptious appetizer, writing a good cover letter will require lots of hard work and time. But the more cover letters you write, the more concise, articulate, and efficient you will become. And, after a few days or weeks, all that hard work will pay off and you will finally be able to dig into the delicious feeling of landing a job. If you're looking for a good cover letter writing service, you can also go to Amazing Cover Letters and have your cover letter professionally written.
By Tegan Neustatter
The job hunt is similar to a three-course meal. Your resume cover letter is the appetizer—great on its own, but designed to make a potential employer's mouth water in anticipation of the main course. Your resume is the main dish—full of meaty, satiating information. And the dessert—the sweet part—is getting the job.

In this case, the appetizer might be the most important part of the meal. Paired with a solid resume, a strong resume cover letter can make you stand out in a pool of job applicants, whereas a weak resume cover letter can land you in an employer’s discard pile.

What is a Resume Cover Letter?
A resume cover letter is your opportunity to explain to the employer why you would be a good fit for the job opening. A resume cover letter is usually no more than three to four paragraphs long, and it fleshes out the skills and experiences displayed on your resume.

Structure of a Resume Cover Letter
Here is a basic outline for a good resume cover letter:

  • Your Name
  • Your Address
  • Employer’s Name
  • Employer’s Address
  • Date
Dear (Employer’s Name),

Paragraph One: The Intro
The first sentence is the most important in the whole resume cover letter because it is your hook. Write something that will make the potential employer want to read further, and try to connect the sentence to the position for which you are applying. For example, if you’re applying to a teaching position, say something about how you’re passionate about working with kids, as demonstrated by your three years of teaching experience and volunteer work. Then use the rest of the paragraph to summarize; your employer should be able to read your first paragraph and get all the important points you want to include in your cover letter.

Paragraph Two/Three: The Nitty Gritty
This is the place to expand on the skills and experiences listed in your resume. (Even if you worked in the lowest position on the totem pole, you still gained valuable experiences that you can apply to other jobs!) But be sure not to simply parrot what’s on your resume; tell the employer how the skills and experiences you’ve developed will make you successful in this position. For example, if your resume says you “interacted with customers and answered inquiries,” then your cover letter should say that your “daily interaction with customers has developed excellent customer service and communication skills.” Three skills that all employers look for in a potential employee: organizational skills, communication skills, and interpersonal skills.

These paragraphs are also a good spot to explain any gaps in your resume or things you didn’t have room for. If you’ve been unemployed, you can point out how you've been productive in the meantime. If you didn’t have room for certain activities or experience that you feel are relevant to the job description, then use this space to address them.

Paragraph Four: Wrap it up with some action
By now you should be done with the substance of your letter and it should fill about three-quarters of the page. Paragraph four simply exists to thank the employer for his/her time and inform them that you will be in touch. Unless the job posting says not to contact the company, tell the potential employer that you will follow up with them in 1-2 weeks. Be sure to include your contact information in case they want to get in touch with you sooner.

Sincerely,
(Your Name)

What Sets Your Cover Letter Apart?
Employers can get hundreds of resumes and cover letters for a single job posting, so what will make yours stand out? One way is to show that you’ve done your research on the company. Recruiters can see right away if your cover letter is cookie-cutter. You’ll have an advantage if you show that you’re aware of the company’s presence in current news and that your hopes and dreams align with their mission and goals.

Another advantage is if your cover letter is well-written and uses impeccable grammar. Employers judge your communication skills and professionalism by your cover letter, and no one wants to hire an employee who will send out sloppy communications to their clients. Even if someone is well-qualified for a position, his cover letter might go straight into the dustbin if his writing is garbage. So save yourself the hour or so that it took you to write the cover letter by taking 15 minutes to proof-read it.

When Do/Don’t I Send a Cover Letter?
According to an article on msn.com, a recent OfficeTeam survey reported that “86 percent of executives thought cover letters were a valuable resource in the hiring process.” Therefore, unless the job description specifically requests you not to send a cover letter, you should send one. However, there are a few industries that don’t require cover letters, like IT positions or part-time jobs. But it never hurts to include a cover letter; in fact, if the letter is good, your potential employer should be impressed with your effort.

How Do I Send a Cover Letter?
These days, applying to jobs has moved to almost 100% online, whether through online job forms or through e-mail. Many online job applications ask you to cut and paste your cover letter or to upload your cover letter as a .doc or .pdf file. Just make sure that the formatting of your cover letter is basic (think 12pt Times New Roman font in a Word document), so that things don’t go awry when your potential employer tries to open your file.

When applying to a job through e-mail, you have two choices as to how to present your cover letter. On the one hand, you can make the cover letter the body of your e-mail, and you can mention in Paragraph Four that you’ve attached your resume to the e-mail. On the other hand, you can write a quick blurb to the employer summarizing your cover letter (not more than 3-4 sentences), reiterate your contact information, and point out that you’ve included your cover letter and e-mail as an attachment. When saving your cover letter file for later uploading/attaching, make sure you give it an easily recognizable file name, like “Cover Letter for John Doe.” That way your potential employer will remember who that wonderful person was that they were going to call for an interview.

Bon Appetit
As with preparing any scrumptious appetizer, writing a good cover letter will require lots of hard work and time. But the more cover letters you write, the more concise, articulate, and efficient you will become. And, after a few days or weeks, all that hard work will pay off and you will finally be able to dig into the delicious feeling of landing a job. If you're looking for a good cover letter writing service, you can also go to Amazing Cover Letters and have your cover letter professionally written.

By Tegan Neustatter
   

Career profile: Sports medicine

sports_med2

From College News - Careers in sports medicine.
Sports medicine offers a challenging field of work varying from injury prevention to treatment and recovery. In addition to the many medical career choices, there are several developing fields of alternative sports therapy.
When a player suddenly faints and falls while playing, there are a few people who try to revive him or put him in a stretcher and take him off the field. This job is little known by spectators. Among the group could be a doctor, a fitness instructor or an orthopaedist. All are branches of the same stream of medicine, known as sports mediicne. In the world of sports, an athlete's fitness and physicial wellbing play a major role in his or her sports career. It is not only diet and fitness, but also medical capabilities to overcome stress that are winning factors. Diagnosing the right ailment and taking care of the performance of the athlete is the basic job of the sports medical professional. Let's take a look at this career in a broader perspective.
ELIGIBILITY
Preferably an individual with science background with additional knowledge of sports -- High school diploma (with science subject) -- four years bachelor's degree in science of science subject in the curriculum -- MDs are surgeons have additional requirements based on their specialty.
SPECIALIZATION IN SPORTS MEDICINE
There are different specializations in the filed of sports medicine; for example, exercise physiology, physical therapy, orthopaedics, sports nutrition, biomechanics, etc. These specializations have different education requirements. For example, in orthopaedics a master's degree is required.
MAJOR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION INCLUDE
Coaching -- science of exercise -- physical, as well as athletic, training -- health and physical fitness promotion
The name of the course and its curriculum varies among colleges and universities.
JOBS
Some of the prominent jobs in the field of sports medicine or exercise science are as follows:
Dietician - The job of a dietician is to plan the diet for an athlete and decide on his intake of essential nutrients. The dietician should have an American Diabetics Association (ADA) approved internship and a certification.
Fitness instructor - A fitness instructor can work either in the gym or for a sports team. He or she works along with the fitness team, which includes the physical therapists, coaches, exercise physiologists, etc.
Exercise physiologist - They are the individuals who monitor the effect of exercise on the athlete's body. The exertion good and bad effects of the same are responsible for the athlete's health.
Medical physician - A medical physician is qualified to diagnose and treat an athlete in case of an emergency. Depending on their qualifications, medical physicians are hired. They mostly work in the medical team or are practicing doctors in hospitals.
Bio-mechanist, occupational physiologist, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation specialist are some of the other jobs available.
SALARY
Salary varies depending on the profession and the experience on has in the field. Generally, professionals make more money when they specialize in specific areas of practice.
TIPS ON A CAREER IN SPORTS MEDICINE
Be sure to include science subjects like biology, physics and anatomy as part of your school/college curriculum.
Do background research on the available colleges and their costs.
Decide on the college according to your area of specialization.
Develop contacts with sports teams and instructors; it is easier to know about the various streams of sports medicine through them. It is also good for networking purposes, which will be helpful while getting an internship/trainee job with a sports club or team.
If you enjoyed playing the sport, you will also enjoy attending to the players.
Like any other career, sports medicine requires education, experience and dedication to excellence. The field of sports medicine is growing, and although it is a part of the discipline of medicine, it is different and offers a lively work environment. If you enjoy sports, you should consider a career in sports medicine.
From College News - Careers in sports medicine.

Sports medicine offers a challenging field of work varying from injury prevention to treatment and recovery. In addition to the many medical career choices, there are several developing fields of alternative sports therapy.

When a player suddenly faints and falls while playing, there are a few people who try to revive him or put him in a stretcher and take him off the field. This job is little known by spectators. Among the group could be a doctor, a fitness instructor or an orthopaedist. All are branches of the same stream of medicine, known as sports mediicne. In the world of sports, an athlete's fitness and physicial wellbing play a major role in his or her sports career. It is not only diet and fitness, but also medical capabilities to overcome stress that are winning factors. Diagnosing the right ailment and taking care of the performance of the athlete is the basic job of the sports medical professional. Let's take a look at this career in a broader perspective.

ELIGIBILITY
Preferably an individual with science background with additional knowledge of sports -- High school diploma (with science subject) -- four years bachelor's degree in science of science subject in the curriculum -- MDs are surgeons have additional requirements based on their specialty.

SPECIALIZATION IN SPORTS MEDICINE
There are different specializations in the filed of sports medicine; for example, exercise physiology, physical therapy, orthopaedics, sports nutrition, biomechanics, etc. These specializations have different education requirements. For example, in orthopaedics a master's degree is required.

MAJOR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION INCLUDE
Coaching -- science of exercise -- physical, as well as athletic, training -- health and physical fitness promotion
The name of the course and its curriculum varies among colleges and universities.

JOBS
Some of the prominent jobs in the field of sports medicine or exercise science are as follows:
Dietician - The job of a dietician is to plan the diet for an athlete and decide on his intake of essential nutrients. The dietician should have an American Diabetics Association (ADA) approved internship and a certification.
Fitness instructor - A fitness instructor can work either in the gym or for a sports team. He or she works along with the fitness team, which includes the physical therapists, coaches, exercise physiologists, etc.
Exercise physiologist - They are the individuals who monitor the effect of exercise on the athlete's body. The exertion good and bad effects of the same are responsible for the athlete's health.
Medical physician - A medical physician is qualified to diagnose and treat an athlete in case of an emergency. Depending on their qualifications, medical physicians are hired. They mostly work in the medical team or are practicing doctors in hospitals.
Bio-mechanist, occupational physiologist, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation specialist are some of the other jobs available.

SALARY
Salary varies depending on the profession and the experience on has in the field. Generally, professionals make more money when they specialize in specific areas of practice.

TIPS ON A CAREER IN SPORTS MEDICINE
Be sure to include science subjects like biology, physics and anatomy as part of your school/college curriculum.Do background research on the available colleges and their costs.Decide on the college according to your area of specialization.Develop contacts with sports teams and instructors; it is easier to know about the various streams of sports medicine through them. It is also good for networking purposes, which will be helpful while getting an internship/trainee job with a sports club or team.If you enjoyed playing the sport, you will also enjoy attending to the players.Like any other career, sports medicine requires education, experience and dedication to excellence. The field of sports medicine is growing, and although it is a part of the discipline of medicine, it is different and offers a lively work environment. If you enjoy sports, you should consider a career in sports medicine.
   

Career profile: Law

law

From College News - Law is not just a career -- one judge's perspective.
I've wanted to be a lawyer all my life. As the son of immigrants, I never considered it possoble for me to be a judge. Now I sit in the very courthouse that is across the street from where I was an office boy. I can hardly believe it!
My law school career as a night student at DePaul University began in the aftermath of the chaotic 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, and culminated with the Watergate Hearings that led to Nixon's impeachment. This was during the highly unpopular Vietnam War whiel the country was still reeling from the recent assassinations of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and Senator Bobby Kennedy. The nation was experiencing riots and demonstrations in the cities and on college campuses, which sometimes led to highly publicized shootings and bombings.
My night school classmates were a pretty conservative crowd of policemenm, firemen, CPAs and government auditors. Although none of us had the luxury of time to be distracted from law by the issues of the day, these events helped shape (or confirm) my personal view that the law can be used as a tool for change.
After seven years as a prosecutor, I opened a litigation practice that continued until the day the Illinois Supreme Court appointed me to the bench in 2003. During those years in private practice, the law led me to some high profile cases and some nice business ventures. So, I gave back.
I founded the Arab-American Bar Association in 1990. In 1997, as president of the West Suburban Bar Association, I founded the Suburban Bar Coalitionof Cook County. Wearing my business hat, I chaired the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce's crime Prevention Awards Committee for a dozen years while sharing ownership in a national security corporation and a bank. Through my family, I worked with St. Jude's Children Research Hospital in Memphis. After 9/11, I wrote, lectured, presented, talked, interviewed and just about did all I could to stop the hate crimes and hate-spreech against Arabs and Muslims (see articles at Arabbar.org).
I often wonder, "How in the world did this happen to me?" My family emigrated from Lebanon with little education. I had no so-called "connections." I believe the answer lies in the fact that in the United States, althoguh not without exception, our courts offer a level playing field for those who choose to use law as a tool for change, as well as a means for making a good living.
I present here 10 of my own "professional maxims" -- if you will -- that I'm pleased to share:
Law is a profession, not a cash register. If you're looking for a fast buck, try car sales or money management.
Even though law is a profession, it's also a great living. Be honest with your clients and the court, use your common sense and listen for the knock on the door of opportunity.
Law is a tool -- use it! Whether you are a patent  lawyer, a civil rights activist or the president of a corporation, law is the tool of choice.
Law is a language, learn it. That's what law school is all about. But it doesn't stop there. Every day, I pick up new ideas and expand upon the language of my profession.
Be creative. Law is the ultimate art form. New ideas and approaches to solving problems are the benchmark of good lawyering. This sort of thing can account for a desegregation case like Brown vs. The Board of Education, or simply finding a good tax loophole.
"Be true to thyself." In other words, always be prepared. Lots of us have the "will to win," says Bobby Knight, but how many of us have "the will to prepare to win."
Join up! Those lawyers who "make the time" to join professional organizations and local community groups are on the top of the heap. That's exactly why they can afford the time to volunteer. Although this is a long-term investment, it will eventually pay back big dividends.
"What goes around comes around." Law is still based upon professional relationships -- camaraderie. Lawyers who do not make good on their word are quickly identified and distrusted. this begins in law school.
Advocacy is no excuse for bad manners. Real professionals know when to fight and when not to. That does not mean to "turn the other cheek," but a good lawyer must never lose composure, regardless of the bait.
Work hard, play hard. Focus on the law, but have some balance outside the legal community that will keep you close to the ground.
By Hon. William J. Haddad
From College News - Law is not just a career -- one judge's perspective.

I've wanted to be a lawyer all my life. As the son of immigrants, I never considered it possoble for me to be a judge. Now I sit in the very courthouse that is across the street from where I was an office boy. I can hardly believe it!

My law school career as a night student at DePaul University began in the aftermath of the chaotic 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, and culminated with the Watergate Hearings that led to Nixon's impeachment. This was during the highly unpopular Vietnam War whiel the country was still reeling from the recent assassinations of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and Senator Bobby Kennedy. The nation was experiencing riots and demonstrations in the cities and on college campuses, which sometimes led to highly publicized shootings and bombings.

My night school classmates were a pretty conservative crowd of policemenm, firemen, CPAs and government auditors. Although none of us had the luxury of time to be distracted from law by the issues of the day, these events helped shape (or confirm) my personal view that the law can be used as a tool for change.

After seven years as a prosecutor, I opened a litigation practice that continued until the day the Illinois Supreme Court appointed me to the bench in 2003. During those years in private practice, the law led me to some high profile cases and some nice business ventures. So, I gave back.

I founded the Arab-American Bar Association in 1990. In 1997, as president of the West Suburban Bar Association, I founded the Suburban Bar Coalitionof Cook County. Wearing my business hat, I chaired the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce's crime Prevention Awards Committee for a dozen years while sharing ownership in a national security corporation and a bank. Through my family, I worked with St. Jude's Children Research Hospital in Memphis. After 9/11, I wrote, lectured, presented, talked, interviewed and just about did all I could to stop the hate crimes and hate-spreech against Arabs and Muslims (see articles at Arabbar.org).

I often wonder, "How in the world did this happen to me?" My family emigrated from Lebanon with little education. I had no so-called "connections." I believe the answer lies in the fact that in the United States, althoguh not without exception, our courts offer a level playing field for those who choose to use law as a tool for change, as well as a means for making a good living.

I present here 10 of my own "professional maxims" -- if you will -- that I'm pleased to share:
  1. Law is a profession, not a cash register. If you're looking for a fast buck, try car sales or money management.
  2. Even though law is a profession, it's also a great living. Be honest with your clients and the court, use your common sense and listen for the knock on the door of opportunity.
  3. Law is a tool -- use it! Whether you are a patent  lawyer, a civil rights activist or the president of a corporation, law is the tool of choice.
  4. Law is a language, learn it. That's what law school is all about. But it doesn't stop there. Every day, I pick up new ideas and expand upon the language of my profession. 
  5. Be creative. Law is the ultimate art form. New ideas and approaches to solving problems are the benchmark of good lawyering. This sort of thing can account for a desegregation case like Brown vs. The Board of Education, or simply finding a good tax loophole.
  6. "Be true to thyself." In other words, always be prepared. Lots of us have the "will to win," says Bobby Knight, but how many of us have "the will to prepare to win.
  7. "Join up! Those lawyers who "make the time" to join professional organizations and local community groups are on the top of the heap. That's exactly why they can afford the time to volunteer. Although this is a long-term investment, it will eventually pay back big dividends.
  8. "What goes around comes around." Law is still based upon professional relationships -- camaraderie. Lawyers who do not make good on their word are quickly identified and distrusted. this begins in law school.
  9. Advocacy is no excuse for bad manners. Real professionals know when to fight and when not to. That does not mean to "turn the other cheek," but a good lawyer must never lose composure, regardless of the bait.
  10. Work hard, play hard. Focus on the law, but have some balance outside the legal community that will keep you close to the ground.
By Hon. William J. Haddad
   

Career profile: Restaurant industry

chef

From College News - A look at the job options available in the restaurant industry.
The next time your go out for dinner to a fancy restaurant, take a look at the staff there. Well-groomed, polite and giving timely service, they may seem less in number, but every person has a distinctive job of his or her own. From the chef to manager, the restaurant industry would be nothing without these people.
With at least one-third of adults having worked in a restaurant during some part of their life, the restaurant business is said to be the industry's largest private-sector employer. According to some studies, the food and restaurant services sector is said to grow nearlty 12 percent each year, with 1.9 million estimated jobs, out of which approximately 47,000 are management positions.
FORMAL EDUCATION
With most people becoming masters in the restaurant industry through sheer experience, having a valid certificate from a good school is an added advantage. Skilled staff is sought after in the restaurant industry, and the compensation is considerably better for those with formal training. Not only must you have a love of food, you much also have a background in management. One could opt for any job, in marketing, human resources, food technology, customer relations or even business and finance management. There are courses offered by various hospitality management institutions in each of  the given fields, but a person from the business are could also fit in with management skills. The duration of courses vary from two to four years, including the area of specialization. Some colleges also offer hands-on experience, as well as an internship. Besides this, some restaurants have their own training services. In this way, employees learn around the clock and excel as time passes.
MAJOR JOB OPTIONS IN THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY
The food service and restaurant sector covers such areas as catering, fine dining, chef-owned bistros, resorts and casinos, hotels, country clubds, fast food chains, hospitals and many more. There are several job options in the restaurant industry, from a preofessional chef to a food buyer. This also is a great time to consider becoming a restaurant manager. The U.S. Department of Labor says restaurant management is an emerging industry and predicts it will continue to grow. Restaurant managers are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the restaurant. Besides the administration and human-resource functions, a manager's job also includes recruiting new employees and monitoring the performance of the current. An individual could be promoted from a front office trainee to a manager and further to a general manager in a matter of months, depending on the quality of the work. And coming to the most important part of the restaurant, which is the kitchen, one could work as a chef, managing and overlooking the subordinate cooks or be a food manager, monitoring the food and beverage stocks of the restaurant. Almost three-fourths of all food service managers were previously restaurant managers, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Most restaurants management professionals hold a two- or four-year degree in restaurant or food service management. For those individuals there are many profitable career options.
Like any other job, working in the restaurant industry requires dedication and motivation. In modern times, the thinking of a customer has also changed. They demand good service and will go elsewhere if they do not receive it. For that reason, it is important for all employees to be well groomed and practice good etiquette. Employees should keep themselves updated with the market trends and always explore new ways to enhance the business by offering better service. To conclude, if a career in the restaurant industry appeals to you, enroll in courses for food service or restaurant management -- and get ready for an exciting and potentially well-paid future.
By Tony Jacowski
From College News - A look at the job options available in the restaurant industry.

The next time your go out for dinner to a fancy restaurant, take a look at the staff there. Well-groomed, polite and giving timely service, they may seem less in number, but every person has a distinctive job of his or her own. From the chef to manager, the restaurant industry would be nothing without these people.

With at least one-third of adults having worked in a restaurant during some part of their life, the restaurant business is said to be the industry's largest private-sector employer. According to some studies, the food and restaurant services sector is said to grow nearlty 12 percent each year, with 1.9 million estimated jobs, out of which approximately 47,000 are management positions.

FORMAL EDUCATION
With most people becoming masters in the restaurant industry through sheer experience, having a valid certificate from a good school is an added advantage. Skilled staff is sought after in the restaurant industry, and the compensation is considerably better for those with formal training. Not only must you have a love of food, you much also have a background in management. One could opt for any job, in marketing, human resources, food technology, customer relations or even business and finance management. There are courses offered by various hospitality management institutions in each of  the given fields, but a person from the business are could also fit in with management skills. The duration of courses vary from two to four years, including the area of specialization. Some colleges also offer hands-on experience, as well as an internship. Besides this, some restaurants have their own training services. In this way, employees learn around the clock and excel as time passes.

MAJOR JOB OPTIONS IN THE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY
The food service and restaurant sector covers such areas as catering, fine dining, chef-owned bistros, resorts and casinos, hotels, country clubds, fast food chains, hospitals and many more. There are several job options in the restaurant industry, from a preofessional chef to a food buyer. This also is a great time to consider becoming a restaurant manager. The U.S. Department of Labor says restaurant management is an emerging industry and predicts it will continue to grow. Restaurant managers are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the restaurant. Besides the administration and human-resource functions, a manager's job also includes recruiting new employees and monitoring the performance of the current. An individual could be promoted from a front office trainee to a manager and further to a general manager in a matter of months, depending on the quality of the work. And coming to the most important part of the restaurant, which is the kitchen, one could work as a chef, managing and overlooking the subordinate cooks or be a food manager, monitoring the food and beverage stocks of the restaurant. Almost three-fourths of all food service managers were previously restaurant managers, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Most restaurants management professionals hold a two- or four-year degree in restaurant or food service management. For those individuals there are many profitable career options.

Like any other job, working in the restaurant industry requires dedication and motivation. In modern times, the thinking of a customer has also changed. They demand good service and will go elsewhere if they do not receive it. For that reason, it is important for all employees to be well groomed and practice good etiquette. Employees should keep themselves updated with the market trends and always explore new ways to enhance the business by offering better service. To conclude, if a career in the restaurant industry appeals to you, enroll in courses for food service or restaurant management -- and get ready for an exciting and potentially well-paid future.

By Tony Jacowski
   

Advice for networking

internship

From College News - Use networking to your advantage in the career world.
There was a time when college graduates were recruited for jobs post-graduation months before they had finished their degree. Today the onus is on students to create their own career opportunities, and this is where networking comes in. In addition to finishing coursework and preparing for graduation, it's important for students to spend time establishing a network of potential career contacts.
WHY NETWORK?
In college you may have networked with the goal of finding new friends. Career networking isn't really about making friends, though you may establish close relationships along the way. It's more about finding resources in your chosen field. Networking will help you learn about jobs and career options. As you network, the contacts you make have the potential of turning into job referrals. Networking can also help you can gain interview experience and increase your professional confidence.
HOW TO GET STARTED?
One of the biggest challenges for students who are getting started with networking is making the mental switch from college student to career professional. In order to market yourself, you need to have a strong sense of your skills and strengths – your "brand." Create a pitch: a simple short description of your skills and your career goals. Be prepared to pitch yourself every time you meet a new contact. Have a personal business card printed with your phone number and email address to present with your pitch. Your card will help people remember you after an initial meeting.
WHERE SHOULD YOU NETWORK?
A good place to network is anywhere that puts you in contact with professionals in your field. Internships and part-time jobs are great ways to meet and observe professionals while gaining hands-on experience. Join professional organizations, attend meetings and conferences, and read journals and other publications related to your field. You can also network at school by getting to know your professors. In addition to serving as mentors, they typically have professional contacts who are interested in hearing about promising graduates. Finally, don't overlook fellow students as good sources for career information both now and in the future.
WHAT ABOUT ONLINE NETWORKING?
Use Internet searches to find out more about companies that could be potential employers. If social media plays a role in your field, get involved in online discussion groups and web-based networking. Be prepared to listen and enter into the online conversation. You can also use social media sites like Facebook and LinkedIn to let friends and family members know that you’re in search of job leads.
POLISH YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE.
To project a positive professional image you need a spotless online presence. Many employers do Internet searches to find out more about potential employees. Avoid posting pictures or comments that depict you as anything less than serious and dependable.
MAKE NETWORKING ONE OF YOUR JOB-SEARCH TOOLS.
Networking should one of the tools in your job-search toolbox rather than the focus of all your efforts. Think of it as a supplement to traditional job-search activities, like visiting your campus career center, sending out resumes and following up with job postings. Also, there's no reason to wait until senior year to network. Once you've targeting a major and field of interest, you can begin making network contacts.
TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL.
Networking is more than just shaking hands and passing out business cards. Take it to the next level by building mutually-beneficial relationships. Show just as much interest in what you can do for your contacts as in what they can do for you. Think of networking as a life-long activity. You may be looking for a job today, but in a few months or a few years, you may be in a position to help someone else in their job search.
Sarah Fudin currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California's Master of Arts in Teaching program, which provides aspiring teachers the opportunity to earn a Masters in Education online and teacher certification. Outside of work Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt.
From College News - Use networking to your advantage in the career world.

There was a time when college graduates were recruited for jobs post-graduation months before they had finished their degree. Today the onus is on students to create their own career opportunities, and this is where networking comes in. In addition to finishing coursework and preparing for graduation, it's important for students to spend time establishing a network of potential career contacts.

WHY NETWORK?
In college you may have networked with the goal of finding new friends. Career networking isn't really about making friends, though you may establish close relationships along the way. It's more about finding resources in your chosen field. Networking will help you learn about jobs and career options. As you network, the contacts you make have the potential of turning into job referrals. Networking can also help you can gain interview experience and increase your professional confidence.

HOW TO GET STARTED?
One of the biggest challenges for students who are getting started with networking is making the mental switch from college student to career professional. In order to market yourself, you need to have a strong sense of your skills and strengths – your "brand." Create a pitch: a simple short description of your skills and your career goals. Be prepared to pitch yourself every time you meet a new contact. Have a personal business card printed with your phone number and email address to present with your pitch. Your card will help people remember you after an initial meeting.

WHERE SHOULD YOU NETWORK?
A good place to network is anywhere that puts you in contact with professionals in your field. Internships and part-time jobs are great ways to meet and observe professionals while gaining hands-on experience. Join professional organizations, attend meetings and conferences, and read journals and other publications related to your field. You can also network at school by getting to know your professors. In addition to serving as mentors, they typically have professional contacts who are interested in hearing about promising graduates. Finally, don't overlook fellow students as good sources for career information both now and in the future.

WHAT ABOUT ONLINE NETWORKING?
Use Internet searches to find out more about companies that could be potential employers. If social media plays a role in your field, get involved in online discussion groups and web-based networking. Be prepared to listen and enter into the online conversation. You can also use social media sites like Facebook and LinkedIn to let friends and family members know that you’re in search of job leads.

POLISH YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE
To project a positive professional image you need a spotless online presence. Many employers do Internet searches to find out more about potential employees. Avoid posting pictures or comments that depict you as anything less than serious and dependable.

MAKE NETWORKING ONE OF YOUR JOB-SEARCH TOOLS
Networking should one of the tools in your job-search toolbox rather than the focus of all your efforts. Think of it as a supplement to traditional job-search activities, like visiting your campus career center, sending out resumes and following up with job postings. Also, there's no reason to wait until senior year to network. Once you've targeting a major and field of interest, you can begin making network contacts.

TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL
Networking is more than just shaking hands and passing out business cards. Take it to the next level by building mutually-beneficial relationships. Show just as much interest in what you can do for your contacts as in what they can do for you. Think of networking as a life-long activity. You may be looking for a job today, but in a few months or a few years, you may be in a position to help someone else in their job search.

Sarah Fudin currently works in community relations for the University of Southern California's Master of Arts in Teaching program, which provides aspiring teachers the opportunity to earn a Masters in Education online and teacher certification. Outside of work Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt.
   

A day in the life of a D.C. intern

internship

An examination of a day in the life of a 24-year-old working in a big city
After attending college in big mid-Atlantic city, I fell in love with it. I find the city just big enough, incredibly manageable, and lots of fun. After persevering for six months post-college trying to find a job or an internship, I landed a position at a newspaper in the city and have enjoyed every experience here for the past year and a half and am looking forward to many more. But what’s life like on a day-to-day basis? Here is an examination of a day in the life of a typical 24-year-old working in a big city:
8:30 a.m. – Get on the bus to head into work, since I’m avoiding public transportation because of delays from a then-recent crash. Pleased it’s nearly empty, crank up Jackson 5, and start reading the a commuter edition of a widely read newspaper.
9:15 a.m. – Arrive at work, give coworker I look up to whom has been in the journalism business for years a birthday card since we are born two days apart. Check Gmail, Facebook, chat with cubicle mate about the weekend.
9:45 a.m. – Send out e-mail reminders to press secretaries about upcoming special section, Many will need second reminder by mid-afternoon. Special sections are inserts in the paper where we invite leaders to write opinion-editorials on various issues. I typically call or e-mail press secretaries to ask if the leaders they represent would be interested in writing. Once a month, I write my own stories for a different type of section, with themes such as “dining” or “arts and entertainment.”
10:45 a.m. – Leonardo DiCaprio’s publicist e-mails me back about energy section. Unfortunately, DiCaprio is filming abroad and unable to write, but publicist wants to meet for a drink if I’m ever in NYC. I jump up and down with excitement in my cubicle. Took an e-mail break and g-chatted with my best friend and dad about my birthday tomorrow.
11:30 a.m. – Started making calls for more Democratic representation in my upcoming energy special section. Most are very receptive, as energy is a big issue these days. Usually I try to call leaders who are in the news for their legislation involving the particular issue.
12 noon – Called press secretaries for added section next week. This is harder to get people to write with a shorter notice, but everything usually works out. Still, it’s a considerable frustration. Much less frustrating: Making lemon bars as an attempt to learn to cook this summer. I brought them into work and they were a success! Most of the interns ate them, and I ate two myself. De-lish.
12:30 p.m. – Usually eat lunch at desk, had leftover chicken fajitas on a salad and some Diet Pepsi because I need caffeine. Read perezhilton.com and people.com, which are my lunchtime rituals.
1 p.m. – Began researching more politicians and celebrities to call for energy section. Most are Senators and Congressmen who have been lobbying for various energy-related issues. I try leaders from Michigan to talk about the cash for clunkers program.  Reading lots of news Web sites like CNN.com
2 p.m. – Called FCC Press secretary again to try to get them to write for an upcoming section on technology. Perseverance and patience are virtues in this business, to be sure. But on a lighter note: Laughed with some members of advertising about a coworker’s husband’s surprise party. Back to business, I IM my boss about special reports.
3:30 p.m. – Contemplated taking a walk because it’s so pretty outside. Decided best to stay in and work. Spending time outside tomorrow in honor of my birthday will suffice. I then e-mail staffers for dates for my Wednesday announcement page. My announcements include birthdays, engagements, weddings and new babies. Might seem mundane, but someone’s got to do it. Broke down and went for a walk anyway.
4 p.m. – Sent out afternoon e-mails to the people who didn’t get back to me in the morning. Chatted with a press secretary about how unusually busy this summer is. The press secretary and I became friends last year after we both found out we were from Pittsburgh. It’s a small world, etc.
4:30 p.m. – Reviewed special reports for July, figured out how many more Democrats and Republicans we need for each, as every section needs a balanced amount of each party.
5 p.m. – Began wrapping things up and responding to e-mails I haven’t responded to yet today. There are always a few that get put aside because of newsroom busy-ness.
5:15 p.m. – Headed home to do laundry after a day’s worth of work
As you can see, I am learning many different experiences working at the paper, including being tenacious in communication, and using technology to interact with co-workers. I read different news outlets every day and have become better acquainted with what makes a great story. It’s important to remember that if you want something badly enough, keep working at it. As cliché as it sounds, you’ll eventually end up exactly where you’re supposed to be. I know I did.
By Anono-Intern
From College News - An examination of a day in the life of a 24-year-old working in a big city.

After attending college in big mid-Atlantic city, I fell in love with it. I find the city just big enough, incredibly manageable, and lots of fun. After persevering for six months post-college trying to find a job or an internship, I landed a position at a newspaper in the city and have enjoyed every experience here for the past year and a half and am looking forward to many more. But what’s life like on a day-to-day basis? Here is an examination of a day in the life of a typical 24-year-old working in a big city:

8:30 a.m. – Get on the bus to head into work, since I’m avoiding public transportation because of delays from a then-recent crash. Pleased it’s nearly empty, crank up Jackson 5, and start reading the a commuter edition of a widely read newspaper.

9:15 a.m. – Arrive at work, give coworker I look up to whom has been in the journalism business for years a birthday card since we are born two days apart. Check Gmail, Facebook, chat with cubicle mate about the weekend.

9:45 a.m. – Send out e-mail reminders to press secretaries about upcoming special section, Many will need second reminder by mid-afternoon. Special sections are inserts in the paper where we invite leaders to write opinion-editorials on various issues. I typically call or e-mail press secretaries to ask if the leaders they represent would be interested in writing. Once a month, I write my own stories for a different type of section, with themes such as “dining” or “arts and entertainment.”

10:45 a.m. – Leonardo DiCaprio’s publicist e-mails me back about energy section. Unfortunately, DiCaprio is filming abroad and unable to write, but publicist wants to meet for a drink if I’m ever in NYC. I jump up and down with excitement in my cubicle. Took an e-mail break and g-chatted with my best friend and dad about my birthday tomorrow.

11:30 a.m. – Started making calls for more Democratic representation in my upcoming energy special section. Most are very receptive, as energy is a big issue these days. Usually I try to call leaders who are in the news for their legislation involving the particular issue.

12 noon – Called press secretaries for added section next week. This is harder to get people to write with a shorter notice, but everything usually works out. Still, it’s a considerable frustration. Much less frustrating: Making lemon bars as an attempt to learn to cook this summer. I brought them into work and they were a success! Most of the interns ate them, and I ate two myself. De-lish.

12:30 p.m. – Usually eat lunch at desk, had leftover chicken fajitas on a salad and some Diet Pepsi because I need caffeine. Read perezhilton.com and people.com, which are my lunchtime rituals.

1 p.m. – Began researching more politicians and celebrities to call for energy section. Most are Senators and Congressmen who have been lobbying for various energy-related issues. I try leaders from Michigan to talk about the cash for clunkers program.  Reading lots of news Web sites like CNN.com

2 p.m. – Called FCC Press secretary again to try to get them to write for an upcoming section on technology. Perseverance and patience are virtues in this business, to be sure. But on a lighter note: Laughed with some members of advertising about a coworker’s husband’s surprise party. Back to business, I IM my boss about special reports.

3:30 p.m. – Contemplated taking a walk because it’s so pretty outside. Decided best to stay in and work. Spending time outside tomorrow in honor of my birthday will suffice. I then e-mail staffers for dates for my Wednesday announcement page. My announcements include birthdays, engagements, weddings and new babies. Might seem mundane, but someone’s got to do it. Broke down and went for a walk anyway.

4 p.m. – Sent out afternoon e-mails to the people who didn’t get back to me in the morning. Chatted with a press secretary about how unusually busy this summer is. The press secretary and I became friends last year after we both found out we were from Pittsburgh. It’s a small world, etc.

4:30 p.m. – Reviewed special reports for July, figured out how many more Democrats and Republicans we need for each, as every section needs a balanced amount of each party.

5 p.m. – Began wrapping things up and responding to e-mails I haven’t responded to yet today. There are always a few that get put aside because of newsroom busy-ness.

5:15 p.m. – Headed home to do laundry after a day’s worth of work

As you can see, I am learning many different experiences working at the paper, including being tenacious in communication, and using technology to interact with co-workers. I read different news outlets every day and have become better acquainted with what makes a great story. It’s important to remember that if you want something badly enough, keep working at it. As cliché as it sounds, you’ll eventually end up exactly where you’re supposed to be. I know I did.

By Anono-Intern
   

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