Admissions

Recruiting strategies that colleges use to attract new students


High school students are taught early on that the college admissions process is highly competitive. Applicants attempt to achieve the highest grades and accolades possible in order to edge out the competition. What is not always made clear during this time is that colleges are just as eager to attract new students to their programs. Schools all over the country go to great lengths to develop student recruitment strategies that showcase the academic, athletic and campus programs available at a particular university. There are many recruiting strategies that colleges are using to reach the next generation of graduates.

Social Media

College recruiting strategies are designed to attract the most promising students directly from high school. This has resulted in extensive use of social media for student recruitment. Universities all around the world have established a social media presence, where interested people are able to examine the online personality of the institution within a familiar and comfortable environment. Some colleges also send out regular updates so that potential applicants are able to remain engaged with the sports, academic achievements and changes that are taking place on campus before ever being accepted.

Online College Fairs

The Internet has allowed universities to extend the reach of student recruitment efforts. A popular recruiting strategy now involves online virtual college fairs that are accessible to anyone with a computer from the comfort of home. These cost-efficient fairs make everything from basic information and brochures to promotional videos available to interested students. There is also an option that will connect a person at home with a live recruiter who is able to answer questions about life at the school, athletics and academic programs. Online fairs have increased the popularity of schools that have not traditionally had national student recruitment programs.

Scholarships

One of the most effective recruiting strategies that most colleges and universities use after finding talented students is to offer scholarships to help with the cost of books, tuition or campus housing. These are normally reliant on maintaining good grades and participating in activities until graduation from high school. There are also some schools that offer scholarships based on specialized testing or essay questions.

Off-Campus Events

A very traditional, but still widely used recruiting strategy, is to hold off-campus events. There are many different types of events, including fun informal gatherings, serious presentations in a hotel or question-and-answer sessions in a local high school. Recruiters for universities that have a specific focus such as fine arts or engineering sometimes give personal recruitment presentations at magnet schools that are directed at classrooms full of students who have already started down a particular career path.

Christine M Harrell  writes about a variety of topics. If you would like to learn more about recruiting strategieshttp://www.collegeweeklive.com/.

   

College fairs - why they are a must for students, parents, and college admission


The college fair was taking place at a local high school and John insisted that his parents go with him. His school had encouraged all high school juniors and seniors and their parents to be there. College fairs are a great place for students to show schools that they are interested in them. Colleges want to accept students who want to be there.

John made a point to introduce himself to each college representative from the schools on his list. He also signed up to receive information from the different schools. His parents talked with the college reps and asked about paying for college and inquired about merit scholarships and financial aid. Together they discussed potential college visits and John set up some interviews that were scheduled while the representatives were still in his city or would be there at a later date.

While John already had a good idea of schools to which he wanted to apply, the college fair helped confirm they were the right choices for him. In addition, he talked with admissions counselors from two other schools that he wasn't as familiar with, but liked what he heard and thought they would be a good fit. Sometimes college fairs help students eliminate schools that seemed like good choices on paper but less interesting when discussing them with a college rep.

College fairs, when approached properly, can help you in the beginning stages of the college search process or confirm that the schools you have chosen are the ones to which you actually want to apply. More importantly, however, they facilitate those all-important contacts with college admissions officers. Those connections can be used in the future when visiting campuses, connecting with the schools via telephone or email, and even as "a personal advocate" when your applications are read by an admissions committee.

Many schools still prefer the old-fashioned face-to-face conversation even though they also are on Facebook and active in other social media. When admissions counselors are able to meet face-to-face with a potential student, they can then begin to associate a name with an actual student. Most schools agree that they want students to have that interaction with their colleges as a way for them to establish a personal connection.

When students and their families get a chance to talk to the representatives and admission counselors, it's so much different than just reading a brochure or visiting the website. It's valuable for students to have face-to-face time, ask questions, and also get the admissions counselors' business cards to contact later on.

College fairs give college reps a chance to meet with students and discuss new changes or admissions requirements at their schools. Websites are only updated so often and brochures may not contain the information students need. John found, for example, that one school on his list was going to discontinue the major he was interested in sometime in the next few years.

College fairs are a good place for students to get noticed, get advice, and get the information they need to make good college decisions.

To find out more about college fairs or college advising, go to http://www.collegedirection.org and sign up for the free college planning newsletter.

Susie Watts is a private college counselor and the founder of College Direction in Denver, Colorado. She assists students with their college search, applications and essays, college tours, test prep, and provides college counseling throughout the college admissions process.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6607412
   

College fairs - are they helpful for college admissions?


College fairs are important for college admissions even though they are noisy, crowded and sometimes overwhelming. The first thing you will notice is a sea of booths, usually set up in alphabetical order, with college representatives waiting behind them. These representatives are eager to meet you and share their knowledge about their specific schools.

College fairs are a great place to explore your educational options. Many national college fairs include all colleges and universities that want to be there. Others like the Metro Denver College Fair are by invitation only and may include a more limited number of schools. Nevertheless, you will meet many people who represent each school and they can be important contacts for college admissions.

High school juniors and seniors should always attend a college fair. You have probably put together a list of possible schools that might be a good fit for you. These are the colleges you should try to visit first. After that, take some time to visit some of the other schools that could be possibilities. This will help you learn more about schools that you are already considering, eliminate colleges that do not interest you or find out more about some schools you have never heard of.

Introduce yourself to the college representative and ask for a business card. You will be asked to fill out a form with your personal information so that the college or university can put you on their mailing list. You can also request specific information on scholarships, athletics or other areas that you want to know more about. Don't hesitate to ask questions about possible majors, campus life or anything else that might be of interest to you.

When you are talking with a college representative, always ask for a direct number for an admissions counselor and the financial aid office. This will help you to make contact if you have further questions without having to deal with a complicated phone system.

College fairs are great opportunities for you to show an interest in a school. This is a factor that is considered in college admissions. They are also a good place to get advice, get noticed and get the information you need to make good college decisions.

Families need to know as much as possible about the colleges that are a good fit for their students. You cannot beat a college visit or a college website for information, but the college fair is also a good source. Students should have a small notebook to make comments about schools or about conversations they have with college representatives. You never know when these might be helpful for college essays or college applications.

If you would like to know more about helping your student with college admissions, go to http://www.collegedirection.org. Susie Watts is the founder of College Direction in Denver, Colorado. She assists students with choosing a college, applications and essays, college visits, interviews, and provides college assistance throughout the college application process. You can also email questions to Susie at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

   

College search tips for Juniors: conquering college search


Initiating the college search in the spring of the junior year: Preparing for the college search

One of the most important things in this initial college search process is to figure out your academic and your financial profile. Your academic profile is mainly your GPA, Class Rank and your PSAT/SAT scores and your financial profile is how much money are you and your family is expected to contribute towards your education. To figure out what is you Expected Family Contribution, you can go online and use the software available to forecast an estimate of your EFC. It is extremely important for you to have knowledge of these items before you seriously do your college search. Every college and university has an academic profile and you have to match your profile to their profile to see if you have any chance of getting in to these institutions. When you look at any institution of higher education, you need to know if your profile is in the bulk of the last entering freshman class. Depending on the strength of your profile and the selectivity of the institution, you could be in the top 25%, the middle 50% or the bottom 25% of the last entering class.

The second crucial piece in this college search process is your financial profile. You need schools on your list that you can afford with little help or no help at all and the only way that you can do this is to be aware of your financial profile. Believe it or not, money will determine where you will attend school. You will apply to private schools and public schools ranging in prices from very expensive to the least expensive, which will be your instate colleges/universities. Besides your state institutions, you may want to look at schools across the country that may be a better buy for your money depending on where you live. There are some great schools in the Southern half of the country with very low sticker price.

Your academic profile will determine what schools you will be able to get in to and if you qualify for any scholarships. Besides the 3 major pieces of your academic profile, your list of activities and sports can make a huge difference in the schools that you will get in to and attend.

In the process of doing your college search, you should look at some schools that are long shots (reach schools), schools that are good match and your safety schools. Safety schools are schools that you know that you can get in to and that you can afford to attend with no financial help or very little help.

The importance of college visits in the spring of your junior year: Finding the right fit for you academically and for your personality

College visits is the only way that you are going to find the right fit for your personality. Each campus has its own personality based on the students currently attending that particular institution. Your success in college will be largely due to the academic and social environment of the particular institution. You may not be able to visit all of the schools that you are researching in the spring of your junior year, so, you may want to schedule some visits to a few schools for the summer of your junior. You should visit a few schools from each level of the schools on your list (reach schools, good match schools and your safety schools). When you are on a college campus, you will get the feel for the campus, the student body, the academic program and the surrounding areas. You will either feel good and comfortable on a campus or not and this how you will find the right fit for you.

College admissions and college placement tests: The importance of these spring college admissions tests

In the spring of your junior year, you should at least take one SAT/ACT test and if you are looking at selective private colleges/universities, you should also take any achievement tests (SAT 2's) that you can in June of your junior year. Colleges and universities usually take the best SAT/ACT scores from your junior year and your senior year. It is to your advantage to take the tests at least twice. SAT/ACT tests are used for admissions by most of the institutions in this country and the SAT 2's are used mainly for placement once you have been accepted.

These tests are the third piece in the puzzle of college admissions and they are not as important as your GPA and your Class Rank. These tests still hold quite a bit of importance because some institutions use these tests to award some of their scholarships.

For more helpful information that can save you time and money, go to the website below: Conquering college search

http://www.collegeadmissionsandfinancialaid.com copy and paste if the link is not alive

By Leonel R. DaRosa, M. Ed., Guidance Counselor

   

5 ways to pay for college

 

We all know that paying for college can get expensive - really expensive! Here are 5 ways to help you pay for college.

 1.         Find Free Money

 Seriously. There’s a lot of free money out there if you’re really looking. There are all sorts of scholarships available, and not just for super athletes or academic aces. There are hundreds of essay contests and other quirky competitions awarding significant sums to college-bound students. Google and Coca-Cola are examples of major corporations with robust scholarship programs.

 Different scholarships are available to students at every stage, so keep your eyes open and apply for aid every year. As financial circumstances change for you and your family, eligibility for financial aid changes as well. Definitely apply for a Pell Grant every semester.

 Also, for those students drawn towards a specific career path, seek out companies and organizations in that field and ask if they offer any assistance. For example, the TEACH grant is brilliant for students who know they want to become teachers.

 2.         Qualify for In-State Status

 The difference between in-state and out of state tuition can be tens of thousands of dollars. There is a lot of red tape in establishing yourself as a state resident, but if you’re sincere about your intention to live there, it is absolutely possible.

 Professional assistance exists that will more than pay for itself while immeasurably reducing the stress and hassle involved in the process. The enormous amount of money you can save is certainly worth a bit of research.

 In-State Angels is an organization dedicated to helping sincere applicants to safely navigate the treacherous bureaucracy as fast and effortlessly as possible.

 3.         Crowdfunding

Call in all your favors and leverage the power of the worldwide web to boost your college savings! Make a compelling case, and paying for college could be easier than you ever dreamed. There are programs like GradSave and GiveCollege geared towards parents who open a 529 college savings plans early on.

 General crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe can be used for any purpose, but you’d better come up with a pretty powerful pitch if this tactic is to be successful. Your best bet is to appeal for funding for a specific project, such as a study-abroad mission, to show that you are not just some lazy kid hoping someone else will pay their way.

4.         Community Service

Programs like the PeaceCorps and Teach for America will not only match certain grants, but offer debt deferment and forgiveness after graduation. These are intense endeavors not meant for the meek, but if the spirit compels you, these are powerful initiatives worthy of your best efforts.

 This world is desperate for enthusiastic young people to serve their communities, and there are plenty of incentives to do so. The Corporation for National and Community Service is a valuable collection of these opportunities.

 Again, there are different options for specific fields. The National Health Service Corps, for example, offers loan and scholarship assistance for students pursuing careers in primary care and public health.

5.         Anticipate and Minimize Indirect Costs

 This is good advice for life in general. The first step is proper planning. College costs extend beyond tuition, housing, books and food. You’re going to have a social life, you’re going to want to go home (or away) on spring break. That’s as it should be, but it needs to be part of the budget from the beginning.

 Having established an overall plan, there are a million ways to mitigate extraneous costs. Buy used books or better yet, get a library card. Don’t drink quite so much; or, if that’s not an option, pregame more (kegs are cheaper than cocktails). Cooking for yourself will save you thousands of dollars over time, and is a fundamental life skill too many students don’t learn until they’re no longer students. Sell your car and buy a bike. If that’s too extreme, at least own a bike and learn to ride the bus.

 Here are more tips on budgeting for college and keeping your costs down.

 Good luck!

 About the Author - Jake Wells founded In-State Angels in 2009 after graduating from the University of Colorado-Boulder with more debt than seemed reasonable. He is on a mission to prevent others from suffering a similar fate, and now advises students on how to get in-state tuition in the fastest way legally possible.

   

8 tips to boost your college application resume


In the cutthroat arena of college applications, presenting yourself in the best possible light includes establishing a first-rate college application resume. To craft one, follow these simple guidelines:
Brief, Accurate Heading
On the top-center of your resume, you should place your name, address, phone number, email, and name of your high school.
Spot-on Objective/Overview
This part appears right after the heading, but it's entirely optional. You only should include this in your college application resume if you have already made up your mind about the majors you'll be taking or the scholarships you're applying for. Otherwise, don't. Broad overviews only project your indecisiveness, and for the admission officers, it's just a waste of time.
Organize the Entire Look
Since there is no specific format for resume-writing, you should decide what sections to put first on the page (aside from Education, which should always follow the objective if ever there is one). Other sections usually include School Activities, Honors and Awards, Employment, Related Experience, Volunteer Work, Enrichment Courses. The sections that are placed first in a top-notch college application resume are the ones featuring your greatest strengths. Think of it this way; If I were to sell myself, what would I want my potential buyers to see first?
Always in Reverse Chronological Order
In each section of your resume, start with the most recent entries first. But remember; don't include achievements earlier than your freshman year in high school.
Stick to Format Basics
This means that font color should be black, font style should be professional-looking ones such as the ever-dependable Times New Roman (please, no comic sans), and 1" margin on all sides. Do not make your resume too long; one or two pages would be best.
Be Active!
You should use the active voice in your college application resume. This means that instead of saying, "I was assigned to be the features editor in our school paper," say, "I edited feature articles in the school paper." Use action words for greater impact. Remember, you want them to think highly of you.
Place Your Best Foot Forward
This doesn't mean that you should embellish lies to appear more desirable in your resume. What it means is that you should highlight everything, which made you proud during your high school; good grades, high ranking in your over-all class, exceptional talents in football, certifications from reputable seminars, projects you spearheaded, theatrical or musical achievements - highlight them all!
Community Participation is the Key
If you could write something related to volunteer work or anything that made you a more productive member of your community, it would certainly be a plus. Even if you do not have many remarkable achievements, you could compensate by sparing some time to involve yourself in the community. Volunteerism does speak a lot.
Remember that some schools have specific guidelines as to what they look for in a resume. Be sure to check that out. Still, these are all surefire ways to help you create your best college application resume. Have fun creating one!
For mote tips and advice, take a look at these tip sheets: college admissions assistance and resume writing services.
By Kaith M Mali
In the cutthroat arena of college applications, presenting yourself in the best possible light includes establishing a first-rate college application resume. To craft one, follow these simple guidelines:

Brief, Accurate Heading
On the top-center of your resume, you should place your name, address, phone number, email, and name of your high school.

Spot-on Objective/Overview
This part appears right after the heading, but it's entirely optional. You only should include this in your college application resume if you have already made up your mind about the majors you'll be taking or the scholarships you're applying for. Otherwise, don't. Broad overviews only project your indecisiveness, and for the admission officers, it's just a waste of time.

Organize the Entire Look
Since there is no specific format for resume-writing, you should decide what sections to put first on the page (aside from Education, which should always follow the objective if ever there is one). Other sections usually include School Activities, Honors and Awards, Employment, Related Experience, Volunteer Work, Enrichment Courses. The sections that are placed first in a top-notch college application resume are the ones featuring your greatest strengths. Think of it this way; If I were to sell myself, what would I want my potential buyers to see first?

Always in Reverse Chronological Order
In each section of your resume, start with the most recent entries first. But remember; don't include achievements earlier than your freshman year in high school.

Stick to Format Basics
This means that font color should be black, font style should be professional-looking ones such as the ever-dependable Times New Roman (please, no comic sans), and 1" margin on all sides. Do not make your resume too long; one or two pages would be best.

Be Active!
You should use the active voice in your college application resume. This means that instead of saying, "I was assigned to be the features editor in our school paper," say, "I edited feature articles in the school paper." Use action words for greater impact. Remember, you want them to think highly of you.

Place Your Best Foot Forward
This doesn't mean that you should embellish lies to appear more desirable in your resume. What it means is that you should highlight everything, which made you proud during your high school; good grades, high ranking in your over-all class, exceptional talents in football, certifications from reputable seminars, projects you spearheaded, theatrical or musical achievements - highlight them all!

Community Participation is the Key
If you could write something related to volunteer work or anything that made you a more productive member of your community, it would certainly be a plus. Even if you do not have many remarkable achievements, you could compensate by sparing some time to involve yourself in the community. Volunteerism does speak a lot.

Remember that some schools have specific guidelines as to what they look for in a resume. Be sure to check that out. Still, these are all surefire ways to help you create your best college application resume. Have fun creating one!

For mote tips and advice, take a look at these tip sheets: college admissions assistance and resume writing services.

By Kaith M Mali
   

Beyond the admissions speak: what to do at a prospective college?


When I was going around looking at colleges, there was sometimes a question about what I should sign-up to do. Should I go to class, listen to an admissions presentation, or eat lunch? At my college, we fill your entire day with all these activities to try to give the prospective student a method of evaluating the college on all its merits as we, in turn, evaluate the student. However, frequently these activities are optional or not advertised as being available.
My biggest recommendation is to do it all: schedule as much as possible, including an overnight visit if that is available. Here is the value I see in some common campus visit activities from my perspective as a campus walk guide. We do things a little bit differently at my school, so I will try to explain all our activities:
Morning Mingling: There is often a time where a bunch of current students are standing around helping you with questions and getting you registered for the day. This is one of the only chances a prospective student will have to seek out a specific current student and ask him questions. I would recommend talking about a student in your prospective field of study and then talking to another student in a totally different major or from a very different location. Over half of students dramatically change their majors from what they intend in four years, so getting a perspective on varied programs of study is important.
The Admissions Talk: I find these generally useless. There are only so many interesting facts an admissions counselor who is trying to sell the school can include in a syllabus full of application deadlines and statistics straight from the college website. Some colleges mandate this meeting and make it the major part of the campus visit. If it is required, I probably would not ask very many questions. The counselors will either give you some statistic in response or they will put everything in "admissions speak," which is usually spun to sell the college. I would focus more on what topics the counselor mentions. Everyone will mention a superior student life, but are any examples given that seem to back this up? Maybe a better indicator is if the counselor discusses student activities and mentions campus parties. All campuses have plenty of parties and drinking, but some counselors obfuscate this fact and that is a potential thing to consider.
Going to Class: First, inspect the overall class choices (if you have this option). Are they all introductory general courses or are there lower level classes of a small size with a specific topic? The latter may indicate that the college offers interesting courses for students who just want to explore different fields of study instead of picking a major and being wedded to that particular track for the entire college experience. I would then select an upper level course in some subject at least semi-related to your intended major. The reasoning behind an upper level course is that the introductory classes only last a few semesters, so most of your time will be spent in whatever the college defines as "higher level." A complete lecture course, one taught by a teaching assistant, or one with many students at this high level may be indicators that the courses are consistently large. My focus in sitting in on a class is observation. The content is pretty irrelevant, in my opinion, and I definitely would not ask or answer any of the professor's questions.
Campus Walks: Hopefully you have the opportunity to go on a walk around campus and maybe the residence halls with current students. This should probably also be an observational time with some well phrased questions. Those are discussed in another piece.
The Cafeteria: This is very important: eat a meal in the main cafeteria. This is a way to observe students interacting with their friends and the cafeteria staff, figure out how good the food really is, and see the kind of diversity the occurs on campus. Often, the cafeteria will be in some sort of student building that will house events and student publications. Look at those. They are not meant for prospective students and that is the point, since nothing is spun to try to recruit.
Overnight Stay: Sometimes overnight stays are reserved for high school seniors or are only available on certain days. Make the effort to stay overnight, even if that means re-arranging travel plans. You will have the opportunity to see students in their "natural habitat" and go to different student activities and club meetings. Remember that the student hosts have signed-up to take you to what you want to do. Yes, they have ten million other things that are due and places to go, but you need to tell them what you are interested in seeing or doing during the visit. Often, if the prospective student has no ideas, the host will resort to showing a movie or doing something easy. While this is still valuable, the host does not know what you want to do, so it is important to tell them.
Be a Wanderer: Act lost. Ask for directions. Smile at people. End your campus visit by talking to admissions counselors, professors, and coaches, but also spend some time observing what goes on in the main area of campus. Current students may or may not know that you are visiting and that potential anonymity gives you the opportunity to see how everyone acts when the visitors are not around. The cafeteria provides a snapshot of this perspective, but I find that spending a couple hours just wandering around people watching may be just as valuable as some of the formal admissions programs.
William O'Brochta is a politics and mathematics double major at Hendrix College, attending on a full tuition merit scholarship. He has given from two to seven campus walks to prospective students and parents and high school and college guidance counselors since his freshman year. He is Campus Campaigns Chair of the Hendrix College Environmental Concerns Committee and Treasurer of the Hendrix College Volunteer Action Committee.
William can best be contacted through his LinkedIn page: http://linkd.in/q8dXm0
When I was going around looking at colleges, there was sometimes a question about what I should sign-up to do. Should I go to class, listen to an admissions presentation, or eat lunch? At my college, we fill your entire day with all these activities to try to give the prospective student a method of evaluating the college on all its merits as we, in turn, evaluate the student. However, frequently these activities are optional or not advertised as being available.

My biggest recommendation is to do it all: schedule as much as possible, including an overnight visit if that is available. Here is the value I see in some common campus visit activities from my perspective as a campus walk guide. We do things a little bit differently at my school, so I will try to explain all our activities:

Morning Mingling: There is often a time where a bunch of current students are standing around helping you with questions and getting you registered for the day. This is one of the only chances a prospective student will have to seek out a specific current student and ask him questions. I would recommend talking about a student in your prospective field of study and then talking to another student in a totally different major or from a very different location. Over half of students dramatically change their majors from what they intend in four years, so getting a perspective on varied programs of study is important.

The Admissions Talk: I find these generally useless. There are only so many interesting facts an admissions counselor who is trying to sell the school can include in a syllabus full of application deadlines and statistics straight from the college website. Some colleges mandate this meeting and make it the major part of the campus visit. If it is required, I probably would not ask very many questions. The counselors will either give you some statistic in response or they will put everything in "admissions speak," which is usually spun to sell the college. I would focus more on what topics the counselor mentions. Everyone will mention a superior student life, but are any examples given that seem to back this up? Maybe a better indicator is if the counselor discusses student activities and mentions campus parties. All campuses have plenty of parties and drinking, but some counselors obfuscate this fact and that is a potential thing to consider.

Going to Class: First, inspect the overall class choices (if you have this option). Are they all introductory general courses or are there lower level classes of a small size with a specific topic? The latter may indicate that the college offers interesting courses for students who just want to explore different fields of study instead of picking a major and being wedded to that particular track for the entire college experience. I would then select an upper level course in some subject at least semi-related to your intended major. The reasoning behind an upper level course is that the introductory classes only last a few semesters, so most of your time will be spent in whatever the college defines as "higher level." A complete lecture course, one taught by a teaching assistant, or one with many students at this high level may be indicators that the courses are consistently large. My focus in sitting in on a class is observation. The content is pretty irrelevant, in my opinion, and I definitely would not ask or answer any of the professor's questions.

Campus Walks: Hopefully you have the opportunity to go on a walk around campus and maybe the residence halls with current students. This should probably also be an observational time with some well phrased questions. Those are discussed in another piece.

The Cafeteria: This is very important: eat a meal in the main cafeteria. This is a way to observe students interacting with their friends and the cafeteria staff, figure out how good the food really is, and see the kind of diversity the occurs on campus. Often, the cafeteria will be in some sort of student building that will house events and student publications. Look at those. They are not meant for prospective students and that is the point, since nothing is spun to try to recruit.

Overnight Stay: Sometimes overnight stays are reserved for high school seniors or are only available on certain days. Make the effort to stay overnight, even if that means re-arranging travel plans. You will have the opportunity to see students in their "natural habitat" and go to different student activities and club meetings. Remember that the student hosts have signed-up to take you to what you want to do. Yes, they have ten million other things that are due and places to go, but you need to tell them what you are interested in seeing or doing during the visit. Often, if the prospective student has no ideas, the host will resort to showing a movie or doing something easy. While this is still valuable, the host does not know what you want to do, so it is important to tell them.

Be a Wanderer: Act lost. Ask for directions. Smile at people. End your campus visit by talking to admissions counselors, professors, and coaches, but also spend some time observing what goes on in the main area of campus. Current students may or may not know that you are visiting and that potential anonymity gives you the opportunity to see how everyone acts when the visitors are not around. The cafeteria provides a snapshot of this perspective, but I find that spending a couple hours just wandering around people watching may be just as valuable as some of the formal admissions programs.

William O'Brochta is a politics and mathematics double major at Hendrix College, attending on a full tuition merit scholarship. He has given from two to seven campus walks to prospective students and parents and high school and college guidance counselors since his freshman year. He is Campus Campaigns Chair of the Hendrix College Environmental Concerns Committee and Treasurer of the Hendrix College Volunteer Action Committee. -- William can best be contacted through his LinkedIn page: http://linkd.in/q8dXm0


   

Getting into college - how big of a part does your GPA play in getting accepted?

thinking

GPA is one of the major things that schools look at when reviewing applications for admission. According to a National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC) 2011 Survey, grades in college prep courses were the most important factor weighing in to the admissions decision. Grades in all courses ranked as the fourth most important factor, behind strength of curriculum and ACT/SAT scores. What this means is that colleges want to see students taking classes in high school that will adequately prepare them to succeed in college, and they want to see good grades in those classes, above all. What constitutes college prep classes? Advanced Placement and Honors classes will be viewed most favorably on a student's high school transcript. "Core" subjects like history, math, English, science and foreign language will carry more weight than things art or music, unless the student is applying to art schools/programs or music schools/programs. Grades in classes like consumer education and physical education will carry less weight because they aren't part of the list of "core" subjects. Curriculum and GPA need to balance out on the student's transcript. Having slightly lower grades in a very challenging curriculum will go farther than having higher grades without challenging classes.
Colleges also look for an upward trend in GPA over the high school career. A student who starts freshman year with an A average whose grades start sliding over the next four years as the student takes on more activities and responsibilities is not going to look good compared to a student who struggled a little in the first year or two of high school and managed to increase his or her GPA in the last two years. Colleges want to see that the student was able to balance coursework, activities and maybe even a job without a large impact to his or her GPA.
The more selective the school, the more the GPA will matter. The general consensus for highly selective schools seems to be that a GPA of 3.5 or above is considered acceptable. A student with a GPA below 3.5 will have a harder time convincing a very selective school that he or she should be admitted. A very high ACT or SAT score would help in this scenario. ACT composite scores above 30 and SAT individual scores above 700 may counteract a GPA in the 3.0 - 3.4 range provided that the student has taken a challenging course load. For students who don't have ACT or SAT scores in these ranges, and have lower GPAs, looking at colleges on the lower end of the selectivity range will make more sense.
In order to match up a student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores to the colleges where he or she is most likely to get accepted, a good college search website is a helpful resource. These sites use the student's GPA and test scores in the search criteria fields in order to produce a list of potential colleges. There are also tools to estimate a student's chance of getting accepted a particular school based on his or her GPA and test scores.
Wendy Nelson is a first-time college mom who has approached her daughter's college search process using her professional background in Project Management. She hopes to help others through the college choice process by sharing what she has learned. For more helpful information to guide you in your college choice process visit http://www.mykidscollegechoice.com.
GPA is one of the major things that schools look at when reviewing applications for admission. According to a National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC) 2011 Survey, grades in college prep courses were the most important factor weighing in to the admissions decision. Grades in all courses ranked as the fourth most important factor, behind strength of curriculum and ACT/SAT scores. What this means is that colleges want to see students taking classes in high school that will adequately prepare them to succeed in college, and they want to see good grades in those classes, above all. What constitutes college prep classes? Advanced Placement and Honors classes will be viewed most favorably on a student's high school transcript. "Core" subjects like history, math, English, science and foreign language will carry more weight than things art or music, unless the student is applying to art schools/programs or music schools/programs. Grades in classes like consumer education and physical education will carry less weight because they aren't part of the list of "core" subjects. Curriculum and GPA need to balance out on the student's transcript. Having slightly lower grades in a very challenging curriculum will go farther than having higher grades without challenging classes.

Colleges also look for an upward trend in GPA over the high school career. A student who starts freshman year with an A average whose grades start sliding over the next four years as the student takes on more activities and responsibilities is not going to look good compared to a student who struggled a little in the first year or two of high school and managed to increase his or her GPA in the last two years. Colleges want to see that the student was able to balance coursework, activities and maybe even a job without a large impact to his or her GPA.

The more selective the school, the more the GPA will matter. The general consensus for highly selective schools seems to be that a GPA of 3.5 or above is considered acceptable. A student with a GPA below 3.5 will have a harder time convincing a very selective school that he or she should be admitted. A very high ACT or SAT score would help in this scenario. ACT composite scores above 30 and SAT individual scores above 700 may counteract a GPA in the 3.0 - 3.4 range provided that the student has taken a challenging course load. For students who don't have ACT or SAT scores in these ranges, and have lower GPAs, looking at colleges on the lower end of the selectivity range will make more sense.

In order to match up a student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores to the colleges where he or she is most likely to get accepted, a good college search website is a helpful resource. These sites use the student's GPA and test scores in the search criteria fields in order to produce a list of potential colleges. There are also tools to estimate a student's chance of getting accepted a particular school based on his or her GPA and test scores.

Wendy Nelson is a first-time college mom who has approached her daughter's college search process using her professional background in Project Management. She hopes to help others through the college choice process by sharing what she has learned. For more helpful information to guide you in your college choice process visit http://www.mykidscollegechoice.com.
   

Guidelines for mastering the SAT

students-studying

Most teenagers must eventually buckle down and study for their college board exams. The SAT, as it is widely known in the field, is designed to measure the verbal and math skills of all young men and women who would like to go to college and secure a formal degree. Though studying will surely be needed, most youngsters can do well with the proper preparations.
Students who are verbally challenged will likely need to develop a sophisticated vocabulary base as quickly as possible. Making flashcards will probably help them remember things better. They should also practice general reading comprehension skills so that they can fit their new vocabulary words into the appropriate grammatical contexts.
While some people might have trouble with the verbal section, others may be struggling with math. In fact, the mathematical principles that are tested on the SAT are rather basic, and most men and women should be able to master them with a little study time. Algebra and geometry will both be emphasized, so students should ensure that they understand both how to solve equations and how to manipulate triangles to come up with the proper angle measurements.
Of course, taking formal courses will be incredibly useful. Teachers who are skilled in the area will be able to provide a range of tips and guidelines that should help individuals succeed further down the road. Students may even meet some friends who they can study with on a regular basis.
Practice tests can also help. When individuals understand the format that they will likely see on the day of the exam, they will be less nervous and more likely to zip confidently through the questions. Practice tests also allow them to check their answers to see which concepts need a bit more work.
On the evening before examination day, people should get a good night's rest if at all possible. This will allow them to be fully alert and ready to attack the test when the morning arrives. Establishing a sense of confidence will also help. Those test takers who know they are ready for anything will generally perform better.
Ultimately, when looking for an SAT prep course Bayside students should look around until they find a class that caters to their whims. With an experienced teacher leading the discussion, the young adults in the course should make significant progress that will translate into high scores later on.
When there is a need to know more on SAT prep course Bayside students can view the related website for more info. Check out this homepage about prep courses by clicking on http://www.satprepcourseny.com now.
By Liza Moye
Most teenagers must eventually buckle down and study for their college board exams. The SAT, as it is widely known in the field, is designed to measure the verbal and math skills of all young men and women who would like to go to college and secure a formal degree. Though studying will surely be needed, most youngsters can do well with the proper preparations.

Students who are verbally challenged will likely need to develop a sophisticated vocabulary base as quickly as possible. Making flashcards will probably help them remember things better. They should also practice general reading comprehension skills so that they can fit their new vocabulary words into the appropriate grammatical contexts.

While some people might have trouble with the verbal section, others may be struggling with math. In fact, the mathematical principles that are tested on the SAT are rather basic, and most men and women should be able to master them with a little study time. Algebra and geometry will both be emphasized, so students should ensure that they understand both how to solve equations and how to manipulate triangles to come up with the proper angle measurements.

Of course, taking formal courses will be incredibly useful. Teachers who are skilled in the area will be able to provide a range of tips and guidelines that should help individuals succeed further down the road. Students may even meet some friends who they can study with on a regular basis.

Practice tests can also help. When individuals understand the format that they will likely see on the day of the exam, they will be less nervous and more likely to zip confidently through the questions. Practice tests also allow them to check their answers to see which concepts need a bit more work.

On the evening before examination day, people should get a good night's rest if at all possible. This will allow them to be fully alert and ready to attack the test when the morning arrives. Establishing a sense of confidence will also help. Those test takers who know they are ready for anything will generally perform better.

Ultimately, when looking for an SAT prep course Bayside students should look around until they find a class that caters to their whims. With an experienced teacher leading the discussion, the young adults in the course should make significant progress that will translate into high scores later on.

When there is a need to know more on SAT prep course Bayside students can view the related website for more info. Check out this homepage about prep courses by clicking on http://www.satprepcourseny.com now.

By Liza Moye
   

How to deal with college application rejection

acceptance letter

Going to college is an exciting and life-changing experience. It is considered a turning point in one's life because you will need to choose the major to take and the college or university to apply to. The college application process is what many high school graduates worry and even fear about. Some are afraid of receiving the dreaded rejection letter with the big "NO" in it.
Of course, it can be really disappointing and some of you might even get totally dismayed to the point that you lose hope and would want to give up on you college plan. Well, that is not the right way to handle rejection! We should accept the fact that at different points in our lives, we get rejected and not everything we want will be given to us.
You just need to deal with the rejection in a light way and consider it as a challenge for you to preserve. Below are some helpful ideas to help you deal with college application rejection.
1.) Rejection is the start of a brand new journey.
Being rejected from the college you applied is normal. Most if not all college applicants get rejected and this rejection can be a blessing in disguise or an eye-opener for you to apply in another college.
Read carefully the rejection letter and understand every detail on it. They might have indicated the reasons for the rejection or other requirements/options for them to consider your applications. Make sure you don't miss anything important in the letter.
2.) You can always re-apply and transfer.
Just because you got rejected from your chosen college doesn't mean you don't have a chance to get in there. You can always re-apply and transfer the following semester or next year. Of course, there are lots of other colleges that you can submit an application. Don't focus on just one or few colleges, open your mind to the thought of getting better education in another school.
3.) Deal with it the same way you handle a breakup.
It is normal to cry and feel sad when you get rejected but don't prolong the agony by doing nothing or being miserable. Cry for a few hours or days then move on and submit more applications to colleges you deem suits your skills, intellect and qualifications.
4.) Make a list of colleges you plan to apply.
Apply in several colleges and not just one or two. It is best to list first the different colleges you are interested in submitting an application. Write also the pros and cons you can find and learn upon research about these universities so you can analyze well if the college is worth the effort or not.
5.) Getting listed on the "waiting list" is a wonderful chance.
Some college and universities got a waiting list which gives student applicants a chance to get accepted. Inquire and know if there is a possibility for you to get included in the waiting list even after you received a refusal letter.
6.) Reassess on what you are really looking for a college - list them.
Changing our minds is common especially among young people. It is most likely that what you like today may not be what you want a month from now. Reassess yourself and determine what qualifications you have and then list the colleges that you feel suits you.
Consider your dreams, goals and likes when planning for the course to take and school to enroll to. If at some point during college, you realized you want to change majors then go ahead think thoroughly and apply.
7.) To get into college is already a BIG achievement.
Consider yourself to be one lucky guy to be able to enter college. Even if you don't get accepted in the top 3 schools you applied, don't lose hope and instead consider attending a community college or if not you can re-apply next year. But of course, it is best not to let a year pass by so consider applying to a community college.
8.) Don't underestimate or neglect scholarships.
Never hesitate to grab a college scholarship that comes your way. College can be costly and having a scholarship to help you with the expenses can be a big help to you and your parents. Inquire ahead on what scholarships are being offered by schools, the government or other organizations. Education is important and worth investing your time, money and effort.
9.) Don't take it personally.
Do not badmouth the school that rejected your college application. Understand that they are not rejecting you but your application. They might be something missing in your application which made them decide not to accept you. If the application process involves an interview, then make sure to do your best so they can get to know you more.
10.) Confide to someone close to you.
Like other down moments in your life, you need someone to be around to comfort you and encourage you to rise up and move on. Talk to someone close, maybe your best friend, your mom, sister, dad or classmate. They can give suggestions that can help you decide on what course of action to take after the rejection.
Above all, never give up on your dream of finishing college. There are many ways to handle a rejection and push through college as long as you show patience, determination and optimism.
If you need help entering college, visit here to get help and advice.
By James P Fraser
Going to college is an exciting and life-changing experience. It is considered a turning point in one's life because you will need to choose the major to take and the college or university to apply to. The college application process is what many high school graduates worry and even fear about. Some are afraid of receiving the dreaded rejection letter with the big "NO" in it.

Of course, it can be really disappointing and some of you might even get totally dismayed to the point that you lose hope and would want to give up on you college plan. Well, that is not the right way to handle rejection! We should accept the fact that at different points in our lives, we get rejected and not everything we want will be given to us.

You just need to deal with the rejection in a light way and consider it as a challenge for you to preserve. Below are some helpful ideas to help you deal with college application rejection.

1.) Rejection is the start of a brand new journey. Being rejected from the college you applied is normal. Most if not all college applicants get rejected and this rejection can be a blessing in disguise or an eye-opener for you to apply in another college.

Read carefully the rejection letter and understand every detail on it. They might have indicated the reasons for the rejection or other requirements/options for them to consider your applications. Make sure you don't miss anything important in the letter.

2.) You can always re-apply and transfer. Just because you got rejected from your chosen college doesn't mean you don't have a chance to get in there. You can always re-apply and transfer the following semester or next year. Of course, there are lots of other colleges that you can submit an application. Don't focus on just one or few colleges, open your mind to the thought of getting better education in another school.

3.) Deal with it the same way you handle a breakup. It is normal to cry and feel sad when you get rejected but don't prolong the agony by doing nothing or being miserable. Cry for a few hours or days then move on and submit more applications to colleges you deem suits your skills, intellect and qualifications.

4.) Make a list of colleges you plan to apply. Apply in several colleges and not just one or two. It is best to list first the different colleges you are interested in submitting an application. Write also the pros and cons you can find and learn upon research about these universities so you can analyze well if the college is worth the effort or not.

5.) Getting listed on the "waiting list" is a wonderful chance. Some college and universities got a waiting list which gives student applicants a chance to get accepted. Inquire and know if there is a possibility for you to get included in the waiting list even after you received a refusal letter.

6.) Reassess on what you are really looking for a college - list them. Changing our minds is common especially among young people. It is most likely that what you like today may not be what you want a month from now. Reassess yourself and determine what qualifications you have and then list the colleges that you feel suits you.

Consider your dreams, goals and likes when planning for the course to take and school to enroll to. If at some point during college, you realized you want to change majors then go ahead think thoroughly and apply.

7.) To get into college is already a BIG achievement. Consider yourself to be one lucky guy to be able to enter college. Even if you don't get accepted in the top 3 schools you applied, don't lose hope and instead consider attending a community college or if not you can re-apply next year. But of course, it is best not to let a year pass by so consider applying to a community college.

8.) Don't underestimate or neglect scholarships. Never hesitate to grab a college scholarship that comes your way. College can be costly and having a scholarship to help you with the expenses can be a big help to you and your parents. Inquire ahead on what scholarships are being offered by schools, the government or other organizations. Education is important and worth investing your time, money and effort.

9.) Don't take it personally. Do not badmouth the school that rejected your college application. Understand that they are not rejecting you but your application. They might be something missing in your application which made them decide not to accept you. If the application process involves an interview, then make sure to do your best so they can get to know you more.

10.) Confide to someone close to you. Like other down moments in your life, you need someone to be around to comfort you and encourage you to rise up and move on. Talk to someone close, maybe your best friend, your mom, sister, dad or classmate. They can give suggestions that can help you decide on what course of action to take after the rejection.

Above all, never give up on your dream of finishing college. There are many ways to handle a rejection and push through college as long as you show patience, determination and optimism.

If you need help entering college, visit here to get help and advice.

By James P Fraser
   

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