Admissions

College search tips for Juniors: conquering college search


Initiating the college search in the spring of the junior year: Preparing for the college search

One of the most important things in this initial college search process is to figure out your academic and your financial profile. Your academic profile is mainly your GPA, Class Rank and your PSAT/SAT scores and your financial profile is how much money are you and your family is expected to contribute towards your education. To figure out what is you Expected Family Contribution, you can go online and use the software available to forecast an estimate of your EFC. It is extremely important for you to have knowledge of these items before you seriously do your college search. Every college and university has an academic profile and you have to match your profile to their profile to see if you have any chance of getting in to these institutions. When you look at any institution of higher education, you need to know if your profile is in the bulk of the last entering freshman class. Depending on the strength of your profile and the selectivity of the institution, you could be in the top 25%, the middle 50% or the bottom 25% of the last entering class.

The second crucial piece in this college search process is your financial profile. You need schools on your list that you can afford with little help or no help at all and the only way that you can do this is to be aware of your financial profile. Believe it or not, money will determine where you will attend school. You will apply to private schools and public schools ranging in prices from very expensive to the least expensive, which will be your instate colleges/universities. Besides your state institutions, you may want to look at schools across the country that may be a better buy for your money depending on where you live. There are some great schools in the Southern half of the country with very low sticker price.

Your academic profile will determine what schools you will be able to get in to and if you qualify for any scholarships. Besides the 3 major pieces of your academic profile, your list of activities and sports can make a huge difference in the schools that you will get in to and attend.

In the process of doing your college search, you should look at some schools that are long shots (reach schools), schools that are good match and your safety schools. Safety schools are schools that you know that you can get in to and that you can afford to attend with no financial help or very little help.

The importance of college visits in the spring of your junior year: Finding the right fit for you academically and for your personality

College visits is the only way that you are going to find the right fit for your personality. Each campus has its own personality based on the students currently attending that particular institution. Your success in college will be largely due to the academic and social environment of the particular institution. You may not be able to visit all of the schools that you are researching in the spring of your junior year, so, you may want to schedule some visits to a few schools for the summer of your junior. You should visit a few schools from each level of the schools on your list (reach schools, good match schools and your safety schools). When you are on a college campus, you will get the feel for the campus, the student body, the academic program and the surrounding areas. You will either feel good and comfortable on a campus or not and this how you will find the right fit for you.

College admissions and college placement tests: The importance of these spring college admissions tests

In the spring of your junior year, you should at least take one SAT/ACT test and if you are looking at selective private colleges/universities, you should also take any achievement tests (SAT 2's) that you can in June of your junior year. Colleges and universities usually take the best SAT/ACT scores from your junior year and your senior year. It is to your advantage to take the tests at least twice. SAT/ACT tests are used for admissions by most of the institutions in this country and the SAT 2's are used mainly for placement once you have been accepted.

These tests are the third piece in the puzzle of college admissions and they are not as important as your GPA and your Class Rank. These tests still hold quite a bit of importance because some institutions use these tests to award some of their scholarships.

For more helpful information that can save you time and money, go to the website below: Conquering college search

http://www.collegeadmissionsandfinancialaid.com copy and paste if the link is not alive

By Leonel R. DaRosa, M. Ed., Guidance Counselor

   

Finalizing your college search: Fall of your senior year


Conquering senior year college admission anxiety: Balancing your senior year caseload and college admission process

Senior year is packed with many challengers that the student and the parents have to face and deal with in a timely fashion, finalizing your search and get all of your applications in order. At this point of the college admissions game, you should be putting your final touches on your college essays with the help of your English teacher. To lessen your anxiety, you should organize all of your applications with the use of a checklist form where you can list each application with the deadlines for all of the supporting documents.

Enlisting the help of your guidance counselor/college adviser can greatly decrease your chances for errors and your anxiety. I highly recommend that you see your guidance counselor/college adviser as much as possible to make sure that you stay on top of everything that you need to have done in the fall of your senior year.

Not only, will you be sending out college applications but you will also be sending out your financial aid applications and scholarship applications with supporting documents.

Narrowing your list of colleges to a reasonable number: 6 to 8 schools are ideal

There are no set numbers of schools that you should apply to because it is totally a personal choice of how much you want to spend on college application fees. Most students will apply to a large number of schools in order to better their chances of acceptance and to better their chances of getting a good financial aid package. Most guidance counselors will recommend that a student apply to 6 to 8 schools in order to cover all of their bases. You should have at least 2 safety schools academically and financially, 2 to 4 schools that are a good match for your academic profile and at least 2 school that are a reach for your academic profile (your pie in sky). It is very important that you pay close attention to your safety schools because these are the schools that you can get in to and that you can afford with little help or no help at all. If all else fails, you will have a place to be next fall.

Stay on top of college admissions application deadlines: Meeting all of your deadlines are crucial to your application being considered

Colleges and universities have deadline dates for a reason and you must be conscious of all of the deadlines. Use a college application checklist to stay on top of your deadline dates. You should meet with your guidance counselor/college adviser to make sure that all of your supporting documents are sent out to the colleges and universities in a timely fashion. You and your parents are ultimately responsible to have all of your applications and the supporting documents in to the admissions office prior to the deadline.

You need to have your request to have any documents sent out from the guidance office at least two (2) weeks in advance of the date that you want the materials sent out to meet the admissions office deadline. Keeping in mind that guidance office/college adviser office will need to put your documents together before they are sent out and you are not the only student that the guidance office is handling.

For more information on how you can finalize your college search and narrow your final list of schools that you are going to apply to, go to the website below to get all of the help that you need.

http://www.collegeadmissionsandfinancialaid.com copy and paste if the link is not alive

By Leonel R. DaRosa, M. Ed., Guidance Counselor

   

8 tips to boost your college application resume


In the cutthroat arena of college applications, presenting yourself in the best possible light includes establishing a first-rate college application resume. To craft one, follow these simple guidelines:
Brief, Accurate Heading
On the top-center of your resume, you should place your name, address, phone number, email, and name of your high school.
Spot-on Objective/Overview
This part appears right after the heading, but it's entirely optional. You only should include this in your college application resume if you have already made up your mind about the majors you'll be taking or the scholarships you're applying for. Otherwise, don't. Broad overviews only project your indecisiveness, and for the admission officers, it's just a waste of time.
Organize the Entire Look
Since there is no specific format for resume-writing, you should decide what sections to put first on the page (aside from Education, which should always follow the objective if ever there is one). Other sections usually include School Activities, Honors and Awards, Employment, Related Experience, Volunteer Work, Enrichment Courses. The sections that are placed first in a top-notch college application resume are the ones featuring your greatest strengths. Think of it this way; If I were to sell myself, what would I want my potential buyers to see first?
Always in Reverse Chronological Order
In each section of your resume, start with the most recent entries first. But remember; don't include achievements earlier than your freshman year in high school.
Stick to Format Basics
This means that font color should be black, font style should be professional-looking ones such as the ever-dependable Times New Roman (please, no comic sans), and 1" margin on all sides. Do not make your resume too long; one or two pages would be best.
Be Active!
You should use the active voice in your college application resume. This means that instead of saying, "I was assigned to be the features editor in our school paper," say, "I edited feature articles in the school paper." Use action words for greater impact. Remember, you want them to think highly of you.
Place Your Best Foot Forward
This doesn't mean that you should embellish lies to appear more desirable in your resume. What it means is that you should highlight everything, which made you proud during your high school; good grades, high ranking in your over-all class, exceptional talents in football, certifications from reputable seminars, projects you spearheaded, theatrical or musical achievements - highlight them all!
Community Participation is the Key
If you could write something related to volunteer work or anything that made you a more productive member of your community, it would certainly be a plus. Even if you do not have many remarkable achievements, you could compensate by sparing some time to involve yourself in the community. Volunteerism does speak a lot.
Remember that some schools have specific guidelines as to what they look for in a resume. Be sure to check that out. Still, these are all surefire ways to help you create your best college application resume. Have fun creating one!
For mote tips and advice, take a look at these tip sheets: college admissions assistance and resume writing services.
By Kaith M Mali
In the cutthroat arena of college applications, presenting yourself in the best possible light includes establishing a first-rate college application resume. To craft one, follow these simple guidelines:

Brief, Accurate Heading
On the top-center of your resume, you should place your name, address, phone number, email, and name of your high school.

Spot-on Objective/Overview
This part appears right after the heading, but it's entirely optional. You only should include this in your college application resume if you have already made up your mind about the majors you'll be taking or the scholarships you're applying for. Otherwise, don't. Broad overviews only project your indecisiveness, and for the admission officers, it's just a waste of time.

Organize the Entire Look
Since there is no specific format for resume-writing, you should decide what sections to put first on the page (aside from Education, which should always follow the objective if ever there is one). Other sections usually include School Activities, Honors and Awards, Employment, Related Experience, Volunteer Work, Enrichment Courses. The sections that are placed first in a top-notch college application resume are the ones featuring your greatest strengths. Think of it this way; If I were to sell myself, what would I want my potential buyers to see first?

Always in Reverse Chronological Order
In each section of your resume, start with the most recent entries first. But remember; don't include achievements earlier than your freshman year in high school.

Stick to Format Basics
This means that font color should be black, font style should be professional-looking ones such as the ever-dependable Times New Roman (please, no comic sans), and 1" margin on all sides. Do not make your resume too long; one or two pages would be best.

Be Active!
You should use the active voice in your college application resume. This means that instead of saying, "I was assigned to be the features editor in our school paper," say, "I edited feature articles in the school paper." Use action words for greater impact. Remember, you want them to think highly of you.

Place Your Best Foot Forward
This doesn't mean that you should embellish lies to appear more desirable in your resume. What it means is that you should highlight everything, which made you proud during your high school; good grades, high ranking in your over-all class, exceptional talents in football, certifications from reputable seminars, projects you spearheaded, theatrical or musical achievements - highlight them all!

Community Participation is the Key
If you could write something related to volunteer work or anything that made you a more productive member of your community, it would certainly be a plus. Even if you do not have many remarkable achievements, you could compensate by sparing some time to involve yourself in the community. Volunteerism does speak a lot.

Remember that some schools have specific guidelines as to what they look for in a resume. Be sure to check that out. Still, these are all surefire ways to help you create your best college application resume. Have fun creating one!

For mote tips and advice, take a look at these tip sheets: college admissions assistance and resume writing services.

By Kaith M Mali
   

Beyond the admissions speak: what to do at a prospective college?


When I was going around looking at colleges, there was sometimes a question about what I should sign-up to do. Should I go to class, listen to an admissions presentation, or eat lunch? At my college, we fill your entire day with all these activities to try to give the prospective student a method of evaluating the college on all its merits as we, in turn, evaluate the student. However, frequently these activities are optional or not advertised as being available.
My biggest recommendation is to do it all: schedule as much as possible, including an overnight visit if that is available. Here is the value I see in some common campus visit activities from my perspective as a campus walk guide. We do things a little bit differently at my school, so I will try to explain all our activities:
Morning Mingling: There is often a time where a bunch of current students are standing around helping you with questions and getting you registered for the day. This is one of the only chances a prospective student will have to seek out a specific current student and ask him questions. I would recommend talking about a student in your prospective field of study and then talking to another student in a totally different major or from a very different location. Over half of students dramatically change their majors from what they intend in four years, so getting a perspective on varied programs of study is important.
The Admissions Talk: I find these generally useless. There are only so many interesting facts an admissions counselor who is trying to sell the school can include in a syllabus full of application deadlines and statistics straight from the college website. Some colleges mandate this meeting and make it the major part of the campus visit. If it is required, I probably would not ask very many questions. The counselors will either give you some statistic in response or they will put everything in "admissions speak," which is usually spun to sell the college. I would focus more on what topics the counselor mentions. Everyone will mention a superior student life, but are any examples given that seem to back this up? Maybe a better indicator is if the counselor discusses student activities and mentions campus parties. All campuses have plenty of parties and drinking, but some counselors obfuscate this fact and that is a potential thing to consider.
Going to Class: First, inspect the overall class choices (if you have this option). Are they all introductory general courses or are there lower level classes of a small size with a specific topic? The latter may indicate that the college offers interesting courses for students who just want to explore different fields of study instead of picking a major and being wedded to that particular track for the entire college experience. I would then select an upper level course in some subject at least semi-related to your intended major. The reasoning behind an upper level course is that the introductory classes only last a few semesters, so most of your time will be spent in whatever the college defines as "higher level." A complete lecture course, one taught by a teaching assistant, or one with many students at this high level may be indicators that the courses are consistently large. My focus in sitting in on a class is observation. The content is pretty irrelevant, in my opinion, and I definitely would not ask or answer any of the professor's questions.
Campus Walks: Hopefully you have the opportunity to go on a walk around campus and maybe the residence halls with current students. This should probably also be an observational time with some well phrased questions. Those are discussed in another piece.
The Cafeteria: This is very important: eat a meal in the main cafeteria. This is a way to observe students interacting with their friends and the cafeteria staff, figure out how good the food really is, and see the kind of diversity the occurs on campus. Often, the cafeteria will be in some sort of student building that will house events and student publications. Look at those. They are not meant for prospective students and that is the point, since nothing is spun to try to recruit.
Overnight Stay: Sometimes overnight stays are reserved for high school seniors or are only available on certain days. Make the effort to stay overnight, even if that means re-arranging travel plans. You will have the opportunity to see students in their "natural habitat" and go to different student activities and club meetings. Remember that the student hosts have signed-up to take you to what you want to do. Yes, they have ten million other things that are due and places to go, but you need to tell them what you are interested in seeing or doing during the visit. Often, if the prospective student has no ideas, the host will resort to showing a movie or doing something easy. While this is still valuable, the host does not know what you want to do, so it is important to tell them.
Be a Wanderer: Act lost. Ask for directions. Smile at people. End your campus visit by talking to admissions counselors, professors, and coaches, but also spend some time observing what goes on in the main area of campus. Current students may or may not know that you are visiting and that potential anonymity gives you the opportunity to see how everyone acts when the visitors are not around. The cafeteria provides a snapshot of this perspective, but I find that spending a couple hours just wandering around people watching may be just as valuable as some of the formal admissions programs.
William O'Brochta is a politics and mathematics double major at Hendrix College, attending on a full tuition merit scholarship. He has given from two to seven campus walks to prospective students and parents and high school and college guidance counselors since his freshman year. He is Campus Campaigns Chair of the Hendrix College Environmental Concerns Committee and Treasurer of the Hendrix College Volunteer Action Committee.
William can best be contacted through his LinkedIn page: http://linkd.in/q8dXm0
When I was going around looking at colleges, there was sometimes a question about what I should sign-up to do. Should I go to class, listen to an admissions presentation, or eat lunch? At my college, we fill your entire day with all these activities to try to give the prospective student a method of evaluating the college on all its merits as we, in turn, evaluate the student. However, frequently these activities are optional or not advertised as being available.

My biggest recommendation is to do it all: schedule as much as possible, including an overnight visit if that is available. Here is the value I see in some common campus visit activities from my perspective as a campus walk guide. We do things a little bit differently at my school, so I will try to explain all our activities:

Morning Mingling: There is often a time where a bunch of current students are standing around helping you with questions and getting you registered for the day. This is one of the only chances a prospective student will have to seek out a specific current student and ask him questions. I would recommend talking about a student in your prospective field of study and then talking to another student in a totally different major or from a very different location. Over half of students dramatically change their majors from what they intend in four years, so getting a perspective on varied programs of study is important.

The Admissions Talk: I find these generally useless. There are only so many interesting facts an admissions counselor who is trying to sell the school can include in a syllabus full of application deadlines and statistics straight from the college website. Some colleges mandate this meeting and make it the major part of the campus visit. If it is required, I probably would not ask very many questions. The counselors will either give you some statistic in response or they will put everything in "admissions speak," which is usually spun to sell the college. I would focus more on what topics the counselor mentions. Everyone will mention a superior student life, but are any examples given that seem to back this up? Maybe a better indicator is if the counselor discusses student activities and mentions campus parties. All campuses have plenty of parties and drinking, but some counselors obfuscate this fact and that is a potential thing to consider.

Going to Class: First, inspect the overall class choices (if you have this option). Are they all introductory general courses or are there lower level classes of a small size with a specific topic? The latter may indicate that the college offers interesting courses for students who just want to explore different fields of study instead of picking a major and being wedded to that particular track for the entire college experience. I would then select an upper level course in some subject at least semi-related to your intended major. The reasoning behind an upper level course is that the introductory classes only last a few semesters, so most of your time will be spent in whatever the college defines as "higher level." A complete lecture course, one taught by a teaching assistant, or one with many students at this high level may be indicators that the courses are consistently large. My focus in sitting in on a class is observation. The content is pretty irrelevant, in my opinion, and I definitely would not ask or answer any of the professor's questions.

Campus Walks: Hopefully you have the opportunity to go on a walk around campus and maybe the residence halls with current students. This should probably also be an observational time with some well phrased questions. Those are discussed in another piece.

The Cafeteria: This is very important: eat a meal in the main cafeteria. This is a way to observe students interacting with their friends and the cafeteria staff, figure out how good the food really is, and see the kind of diversity the occurs on campus. Often, the cafeteria will be in some sort of student building that will house events and student publications. Look at those. They are not meant for prospective students and that is the point, since nothing is spun to try to recruit.

Overnight Stay: Sometimes overnight stays are reserved for high school seniors or are only available on certain days. Make the effort to stay overnight, even if that means re-arranging travel plans. You will have the opportunity to see students in their "natural habitat" and go to different student activities and club meetings. Remember that the student hosts have signed-up to take you to what you want to do. Yes, they have ten million other things that are due and places to go, but you need to tell them what you are interested in seeing or doing during the visit. Often, if the prospective student has no ideas, the host will resort to showing a movie or doing something easy. While this is still valuable, the host does not know what you want to do, so it is important to tell them.

Be a Wanderer: Act lost. Ask for directions. Smile at people. End your campus visit by talking to admissions counselors, professors, and coaches, but also spend some time observing what goes on in the main area of campus. Current students may or may not know that you are visiting and that potential anonymity gives you the opportunity to see how everyone acts when the visitors are not around. The cafeteria provides a snapshot of this perspective, but I find that spending a couple hours just wandering around people watching may be just as valuable as some of the formal admissions programs.

William O'Brochta is a politics and mathematics double major at Hendrix College, attending on a full tuition merit scholarship. He has given from two to seven campus walks to prospective students and parents and high school and college guidance counselors since his freshman year. He is Campus Campaigns Chair of the Hendrix College Environmental Concerns Committee and Treasurer of the Hendrix College Volunteer Action Committee. -- William can best be contacted through his LinkedIn page: http://linkd.in/q8dXm0


   

Getting into college - how big of a part does your GPA play in getting accepted?

thinking

GPA is one of the major things that schools look at when reviewing applications for admission. According to a National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC) 2011 Survey, grades in college prep courses were the most important factor weighing in to the admissions decision. Grades in all courses ranked as the fourth most important factor, behind strength of curriculum and ACT/SAT scores. What this means is that colleges want to see students taking classes in high school that will adequately prepare them to succeed in college, and they want to see good grades in those classes, above all. What constitutes college prep classes? Advanced Placement and Honors classes will be viewed most favorably on a student's high school transcript. "Core" subjects like history, math, English, science and foreign language will carry more weight than things art or music, unless the student is applying to art schools/programs or music schools/programs. Grades in classes like consumer education and physical education will carry less weight because they aren't part of the list of "core" subjects. Curriculum and GPA need to balance out on the student's transcript. Having slightly lower grades in a very challenging curriculum will go farther than having higher grades without challenging classes.
Colleges also look for an upward trend in GPA over the high school career. A student who starts freshman year with an A average whose grades start sliding over the next four years as the student takes on more activities and responsibilities is not going to look good compared to a student who struggled a little in the first year or two of high school and managed to increase his or her GPA in the last two years. Colleges want to see that the student was able to balance coursework, activities and maybe even a job without a large impact to his or her GPA.
The more selective the school, the more the GPA will matter. The general consensus for highly selective schools seems to be that a GPA of 3.5 or above is considered acceptable. A student with a GPA below 3.5 will have a harder time convincing a very selective school that he or she should be admitted. A very high ACT or SAT score would help in this scenario. ACT composite scores above 30 and SAT individual scores above 700 may counteract a GPA in the 3.0 - 3.4 range provided that the student has taken a challenging course load. For students who don't have ACT or SAT scores in these ranges, and have lower GPAs, looking at colleges on the lower end of the selectivity range will make more sense.
In order to match up a student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores to the colleges where he or she is most likely to get accepted, a good college search website is a helpful resource. These sites use the student's GPA and test scores in the search criteria fields in order to produce a list of potential colleges. There are also tools to estimate a student's chance of getting accepted a particular school based on his or her GPA and test scores.
Wendy Nelson is a first-time college mom who has approached her daughter's college search process using her professional background in Project Management. She hopes to help others through the college choice process by sharing what she has learned. For more helpful information to guide you in your college choice process visit http://www.mykidscollegechoice.com.
GPA is one of the major things that schools look at when reviewing applications for admission. According to a National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC) 2011 Survey, grades in college prep courses were the most important factor weighing in to the admissions decision. Grades in all courses ranked as the fourth most important factor, behind strength of curriculum and ACT/SAT scores. What this means is that colleges want to see students taking classes in high school that will adequately prepare them to succeed in college, and they want to see good grades in those classes, above all. What constitutes college prep classes? Advanced Placement and Honors classes will be viewed most favorably on a student's high school transcript. "Core" subjects like history, math, English, science and foreign language will carry more weight than things art or music, unless the student is applying to art schools/programs or music schools/programs. Grades in classes like consumer education and physical education will carry less weight because they aren't part of the list of "core" subjects. Curriculum and GPA need to balance out on the student's transcript. Having slightly lower grades in a very challenging curriculum will go farther than having higher grades without challenging classes.

Colleges also look for an upward trend in GPA over the high school career. A student who starts freshman year with an A average whose grades start sliding over the next four years as the student takes on more activities and responsibilities is not going to look good compared to a student who struggled a little in the first year or two of high school and managed to increase his or her GPA in the last two years. Colleges want to see that the student was able to balance coursework, activities and maybe even a job without a large impact to his or her GPA.

The more selective the school, the more the GPA will matter. The general consensus for highly selective schools seems to be that a GPA of 3.5 or above is considered acceptable. A student with a GPA below 3.5 will have a harder time convincing a very selective school that he or she should be admitted. A very high ACT or SAT score would help in this scenario. ACT composite scores above 30 and SAT individual scores above 700 may counteract a GPA in the 3.0 - 3.4 range provided that the student has taken a challenging course load. For students who don't have ACT or SAT scores in these ranges, and have lower GPAs, looking at colleges on the lower end of the selectivity range will make more sense.

In order to match up a student's GPA and ACT/SAT scores to the colleges where he or she is most likely to get accepted, a good college search website is a helpful resource. These sites use the student's GPA and test scores in the search criteria fields in order to produce a list of potential colleges. There are also tools to estimate a student's chance of getting accepted a particular school based on his or her GPA and test scores.

Wendy Nelson is a first-time college mom who has approached her daughter's college search process using her professional background in Project Management. She hopes to help others through the college choice process by sharing what she has learned. For more helpful information to guide you in your college choice process visit http://www.mykidscollegechoice.com.
   

Guidelines for mastering the SAT

students-studying

Most teenagers must eventually buckle down and study for their college board exams. The SAT, as it is widely known in the field, is designed to measure the verbal and math skills of all young men and women who would like to go to college and secure a formal degree. Though studying will surely be needed, most youngsters can do well with the proper preparations.
Students who are verbally challenged will likely need to develop a sophisticated vocabulary base as quickly as possible. Making flashcards will probably help them remember things better. They should also practice general reading comprehension skills so that they can fit their new vocabulary words into the appropriate grammatical contexts.
While some people might have trouble with the verbal section, others may be struggling with math. In fact, the mathematical principles that are tested on the SAT are rather basic, and most men and women should be able to master them with a little study time. Algebra and geometry will both be emphasized, so students should ensure that they understand both how to solve equations and how to manipulate triangles to come up with the proper angle measurements.
Of course, taking formal courses will be incredibly useful. Teachers who are skilled in the area will be able to provide a range of tips and guidelines that should help individuals succeed further down the road. Students may even meet some friends who they can study with on a regular basis.
Practice tests can also help. When individuals understand the format that they will likely see on the day of the exam, they will be less nervous and more likely to zip confidently through the questions. Practice tests also allow them to check their answers to see which concepts need a bit more work.
On the evening before examination day, people should get a good night's rest if at all possible. This will allow them to be fully alert and ready to attack the test when the morning arrives. Establishing a sense of confidence will also help. Those test takers who know they are ready for anything will generally perform better.
Ultimately, when looking for an SAT prep course Bayside students should look around until they find a class that caters to their whims. With an experienced teacher leading the discussion, the young adults in the course should make significant progress that will translate into high scores later on.
When there is a need to know more on SAT prep course Bayside students can view the related website for more info. Check out this homepage about prep courses by clicking on http://www.satprepcourseny.com now.
By Liza Moye
Most teenagers must eventually buckle down and study for their college board exams. The SAT, as it is widely known in the field, is designed to measure the verbal and math skills of all young men and women who would like to go to college and secure a formal degree. Though studying will surely be needed, most youngsters can do well with the proper preparations.

Students who are verbally challenged will likely need to develop a sophisticated vocabulary base as quickly as possible. Making flashcards will probably help them remember things better. They should also practice general reading comprehension skills so that they can fit their new vocabulary words into the appropriate grammatical contexts.

While some people might have trouble with the verbal section, others may be struggling with math. In fact, the mathematical principles that are tested on the SAT are rather basic, and most men and women should be able to master them with a little study time. Algebra and geometry will both be emphasized, so students should ensure that they understand both how to solve equations and how to manipulate triangles to come up with the proper angle measurements.

Of course, taking formal courses will be incredibly useful. Teachers who are skilled in the area will be able to provide a range of tips and guidelines that should help individuals succeed further down the road. Students may even meet some friends who they can study with on a regular basis.

Practice tests can also help. When individuals understand the format that they will likely see on the day of the exam, they will be less nervous and more likely to zip confidently through the questions. Practice tests also allow them to check their answers to see which concepts need a bit more work.

On the evening before examination day, people should get a good night's rest if at all possible. This will allow them to be fully alert and ready to attack the test when the morning arrives. Establishing a sense of confidence will also help. Those test takers who know they are ready for anything will generally perform better.

Ultimately, when looking for an SAT prep course Bayside students should look around until they find a class that caters to their whims. With an experienced teacher leading the discussion, the young adults in the course should make significant progress that will translate into high scores later on.

When there is a need to know more on SAT prep course Bayside students can view the related website for more info. Check out this homepage about prep courses by clicking on http://www.satprepcourseny.com now.

By Liza Moye
   

How to deal with college application rejection

acceptance letter

Going to college is an exciting and life-changing experience. It is considered a turning point in one's life because you will need to choose the major to take and the college or university to apply to. The college application process is what many high school graduates worry and even fear about. Some are afraid of receiving the dreaded rejection letter with the big "NO" in it.
Of course, it can be really disappointing and some of you might even get totally dismayed to the point that you lose hope and would want to give up on you college plan. Well, that is not the right way to handle rejection! We should accept the fact that at different points in our lives, we get rejected and not everything we want will be given to us.
You just need to deal with the rejection in a light way and consider it as a challenge for you to preserve. Below are some helpful ideas to help you deal with college application rejection.
1.) Rejection is the start of a brand new journey.
Being rejected from the college you applied is normal. Most if not all college applicants get rejected and this rejection can be a blessing in disguise or an eye-opener for you to apply in another college.
Read carefully the rejection letter and understand every detail on it. They might have indicated the reasons for the rejection or other requirements/options for them to consider your applications. Make sure you don't miss anything important in the letter.
2.) You can always re-apply and transfer.
Just because you got rejected from your chosen college doesn't mean you don't have a chance to get in there. You can always re-apply and transfer the following semester or next year. Of course, there are lots of other colleges that you can submit an application. Don't focus on just one or few colleges, open your mind to the thought of getting better education in another school.
3.) Deal with it the same way you handle a breakup.
It is normal to cry and feel sad when you get rejected but don't prolong the agony by doing nothing or being miserable. Cry for a few hours or days then move on and submit more applications to colleges you deem suits your skills, intellect and qualifications.
4.) Make a list of colleges you plan to apply.
Apply in several colleges and not just one or two. It is best to list first the different colleges you are interested in submitting an application. Write also the pros and cons you can find and learn upon research about these universities so you can analyze well if the college is worth the effort or not.
5.) Getting listed on the "waiting list" is a wonderful chance.
Some college and universities got a waiting list which gives student applicants a chance to get accepted. Inquire and know if there is a possibility for you to get included in the waiting list even after you received a refusal letter.
6.) Reassess on what you are really looking for a college - list them.
Changing our minds is common especially among young people. It is most likely that what you like today may not be what you want a month from now. Reassess yourself and determine what qualifications you have and then list the colleges that you feel suits you.
Consider your dreams, goals and likes when planning for the course to take and school to enroll to. If at some point during college, you realized you want to change majors then go ahead think thoroughly and apply.
7.) To get into college is already a BIG achievement.
Consider yourself to be one lucky guy to be able to enter college. Even if you don't get accepted in the top 3 schools you applied, don't lose hope and instead consider attending a community college or if not you can re-apply next year. But of course, it is best not to let a year pass by so consider applying to a community college.
8.) Don't underestimate or neglect scholarships.
Never hesitate to grab a college scholarship that comes your way. College can be costly and having a scholarship to help you with the expenses can be a big help to you and your parents. Inquire ahead on what scholarships are being offered by schools, the government or other organizations. Education is important and worth investing your time, money and effort.
9.) Don't take it personally.
Do not badmouth the school that rejected your college application. Understand that they are not rejecting you but your application. They might be something missing in your application which made them decide not to accept you. If the application process involves an interview, then make sure to do your best so they can get to know you more.
10.) Confide to someone close to you.
Like other down moments in your life, you need someone to be around to comfort you and encourage you to rise up and move on. Talk to someone close, maybe your best friend, your mom, sister, dad or classmate. They can give suggestions that can help you decide on what course of action to take after the rejection.
Above all, never give up on your dream of finishing college. There are many ways to handle a rejection and push through college as long as you show patience, determination and optimism.
If you need help entering college, visit here to get help and advice.
By James P Fraser
Going to college is an exciting and life-changing experience. It is considered a turning point in one's life because you will need to choose the major to take and the college or university to apply to. The college application process is what many high school graduates worry and even fear about. Some are afraid of receiving the dreaded rejection letter with the big "NO" in it.

Of course, it can be really disappointing and some of you might even get totally dismayed to the point that you lose hope and would want to give up on you college plan. Well, that is not the right way to handle rejection! We should accept the fact that at different points in our lives, we get rejected and not everything we want will be given to us.

You just need to deal with the rejection in a light way and consider it as a challenge for you to preserve. Below are some helpful ideas to help you deal with college application rejection.

1.) Rejection is the start of a brand new journey. Being rejected from the college you applied is normal. Most if not all college applicants get rejected and this rejection can be a blessing in disguise or an eye-opener for you to apply in another college.

Read carefully the rejection letter and understand every detail on it. They might have indicated the reasons for the rejection or other requirements/options for them to consider your applications. Make sure you don't miss anything important in the letter.

2.) You can always re-apply and transfer. Just because you got rejected from your chosen college doesn't mean you don't have a chance to get in there. You can always re-apply and transfer the following semester or next year. Of course, there are lots of other colleges that you can submit an application. Don't focus on just one or few colleges, open your mind to the thought of getting better education in another school.

3.) Deal with it the same way you handle a breakup. It is normal to cry and feel sad when you get rejected but don't prolong the agony by doing nothing or being miserable. Cry for a few hours or days then move on and submit more applications to colleges you deem suits your skills, intellect and qualifications.

4.) Make a list of colleges you plan to apply. Apply in several colleges and not just one or two. It is best to list first the different colleges you are interested in submitting an application. Write also the pros and cons you can find and learn upon research about these universities so you can analyze well if the college is worth the effort or not.

5.) Getting listed on the "waiting list" is a wonderful chance. Some college and universities got a waiting list which gives student applicants a chance to get accepted. Inquire and know if there is a possibility for you to get included in the waiting list even after you received a refusal letter.

6.) Reassess on what you are really looking for a college - list them. Changing our minds is common especially among young people. It is most likely that what you like today may not be what you want a month from now. Reassess yourself and determine what qualifications you have and then list the colleges that you feel suits you.

Consider your dreams, goals and likes when planning for the course to take and school to enroll to. If at some point during college, you realized you want to change majors then go ahead think thoroughly and apply.

7.) To get into college is already a BIG achievement. Consider yourself to be one lucky guy to be able to enter college. Even if you don't get accepted in the top 3 schools you applied, don't lose hope and instead consider attending a community college or if not you can re-apply next year. But of course, it is best not to let a year pass by so consider applying to a community college.

8.) Don't underestimate or neglect scholarships. Never hesitate to grab a college scholarship that comes your way. College can be costly and having a scholarship to help you with the expenses can be a big help to you and your parents. Inquire ahead on what scholarships are being offered by schools, the government or other organizations. Education is important and worth investing your time, money and effort.

9.) Don't take it personally. Do not badmouth the school that rejected your college application. Understand that they are not rejecting you but your application. They might be something missing in your application which made them decide not to accept you. If the application process involves an interview, then make sure to do your best so they can get to know you more.

10.) Confide to someone close to you. Like other down moments in your life, you need someone to be around to comfort you and encourage you to rise up and move on. Talk to someone close, maybe your best friend, your mom, sister, dad or classmate. They can give suggestions that can help you decide on what course of action to take after the rejection.

Above all, never give up on your dream of finishing college. There are many ways to handle a rejection and push through college as long as you show patience, determination and optimism.

If you need help entering college, visit here to get help and advice.

By James P Fraser
   

Enrolling in college can be a breeze by following these guidelines

acceptance letter

Remember that your reputation in high school did not follow you to college. College will demand different skills and an adjustment period for you to feel comfortable. Try new things and push yourself to succeed.
Along with your required course load, make sure you add some extracurricular activities. By participating in a variety of activities, you will have a better resume for future employment applications. Keep a balanced approach.
You need to socialize during orientation and at certain events. A lot of college students do not know anyone on their first day and feel lonely. By participating in social activities right away, you will be able to meet others who are in the same boat and looking to make friends.
Pay your credit card balance in full every month. If you carry a balance, the interest and late fees add up quickly. Keep in mind that the main reason to have a credit card in college is for emergency use. Monitor your spending and keep in mind that your main goal is to get an education. Don't let yourself become distracted by financial woes.
Bring all the toiletries you need with you when you go off to college. When you don't have enough, you'll run out in a hurry. Shop around for good deals by buying in bulk from outlet stores when possible.
Study as much as possible each day. If you devote yourself to college, you can get the most out of it. Consider college as important as you would any job, but don't overlook the social aspects. The more effort you can put into your schoolwork, the better chance you have at having a better career after graduation.
If you excel in a specific academic area, why wouldn't you use it to earn money? You can use your knowledge to tutor students and earn extra money. Advertise your tutoring services in the dorms as well as the student centers. You could also put an ad in the school newspaper or in the student cafeteria.
Oftentimes, joining a sports team can help you meet new and exciting people. Playing sports in college, however, is not cheap and will require additional spending for things such as uniforms, equipment and trips.
Educate yourself about the career of your choice before you choose a college. This will ensure that the college you choose will offer the courses you need to take in order to get the degree you are interested in obtaining. Speak to admissions to find out if they can help you get the education you require.
You can go overseas with your kids. Unfortunately, many students with children will immediately write-off the opportunity to study any courses overseas. Speak to the school to find out what options you have. Certain programs just cannot be done with children involved, but many others can certainly accommodate your whole family.
Hopefully you are now less afraid of college, armed with the advice above. As you have learned, it is possible for anyone to graduate when armed with the proper tools and right planning. Use this advice and you could even come out with honors! College can be everything that you want it to be, and more.
By Beth S Panelly -- Beth has been an enrollment counselor for over 5 years. For more info on this article content, please view her other articles. Go here sports fundraising ideas for ways to help you financially should you decide to play extracurricular sports in college.
Remember that your reputation in high school did not follow you to college. College will demand different skills and an adjustment period for you to feel comfortable. Try new things and push yourself to succeed.

Along with your required course load, make sure you add some extracurricular activities. By participating in a variety of activities, you will have a better resume for future employment applications. Keep a balanced approach.

You need to socialize during orientation and at certain events. A lot of college students do not know anyone on their first day and feel lonely. By participating in social activities right away, you will be able to meet others who are in the same boat and looking to make friends.

Pay your credit card balance in full every month. If you carry a balance, the interest and late fees add up quickly. Keep in mind that the main reason to have a credit card in college is for emergency use. Monitor your spending and keep in mind that your main goal is to get an education. Don't let yourself become distracted by financial woes.

Bring all the toiletries you need with you when you go off to college. When you don't have enough, you'll run out in a hurry. Shop around for good deals by buying in bulk from outlet stores when possible.

Study as much as possible each day. If you devote yourself to college, you can get the most out of it. Consider college as important as you would any job, but don't overlook the social aspects. The more effort you can put into your schoolwork, the better chance you have at having a better career after graduation.

If you excel in a specific academic area, why wouldn't you use it to earn money? You can use your knowledge to tutor students and earn extra money. Advertise your tutoring services in the dorms as well as the student centers. You could also put an ad in the school newspaper or in the student cafeteria.

Oftentimes, joining a sports team can help you meet new and exciting people. Playing sports in college, however, is not cheap and will require additional spending for things such as uniforms, equipment and trips.

Educate yourself about the career of your choice before you choose a college. This will ensure that the college you choose will offer the courses you need to take in order to get the degree you are interested in obtaining. Speak to admissions to find out if they can help you get the education you require.

You can go overseas with your kids. Unfortunately, many students with children will immediately write-off the opportunity to study any courses overseas. Speak to the school to find out what options you have. Certain programs just cannot be done with children involved, but many others can certainly accommodate your whole family.

Hopefully you are now less afraid of college, armed with the advice above. As you have learned, it is possible for anyone to graduate when armed with the proper tools and right planning. Use this advice and you could even come out with honors! College can be everything that you want it to be, and more.

By Beth S Panelly -- Beth has been an enrollment counselor for over 5 years. For more info on this article content, please view her other articles. Go here sports fundraising ideas for ways to help you financially should you decide to play extracurricular sports in college.
   

College admissions: the importance of first impressions

internship

Juliet questioned "What's in a name?" And when it comes to communicating with the colleges, you may think that as well. But, what if you're wrong?
Let's say you decide you like Costalotta University and decide to send them an email asking about their biochemistry program, for example. This is a great idea. So, you send that email and the person who receives your email at Costalotta U sees in their email inbox your email from Lax4Lyfe Or what if it's party4eva?
What if your email name makes you sound more like a slacker or a partier (which you're not) than a potential candidate (which you are) they want to have on their campus?
Maybe your email address is a childhood nickname or based on an inside joke, like 9andahalftoes? When it comes time to look over your file, do you really want the admissions folks to think of you as "cuddlybear"?
And what if your screen name could be considered offensive or just plain weird?
The solution? Create a "just for college" email address using your name or your first initial and last name - you get the idea. You can always forward the emails to your more personal email address that you can continue to use with friends or use a mail management program like Microsoft's Outlook or Apple's Mail to automatically check all of your email accounts.
Your "name only" email account might be boring, but it won't give colleges (or future employers) a bad first impression.
Another place to stay on top of when it comes to where you might make an impression is Facebook. They say a picture is worth a thousand words - but you might not ever get to say 10 words to even begin explaining some wacky photo that you or one of your friends posted to your wall. Colleges (and future employers) could check out your page (because you "liked" the college's page) to learn a little more about you than what is in your application.
If you said in your application that you love community service but on your Facebook page you posted a status saying you skipped out (again) on your scheduled time volunteering at the library, what do you think that might do to your application?
You only get one chance to make a first impression. Part of your Smart Plan For College should include some strategies to make sure that the impression you make with the colleges is a good one.
Your Smart Plan For College Assignment:
Take stock of all the places a college might get a "first impression" - your email address, your Facebook page, your Twitter account, Pinterest, Google + - wherever.
Give your online presence the "Grandma" test - if you wouldn't want your grandmother to see it, then you need to make some changes!
Then, change your email address, delete questionable photos or statements, block so-called friends who think it's hilarious to post dumb things on your wall - do whatever it takes to make sure your first impression is a good one. It is your name, after all.
Jeanmarie Keller has helped thousands of students get into colleges they love while making sure their parents save a fortune on the bill. Jeanmarie is the creator of the Smart Plan For College System which teaches her client-families how to get noticed in the admissions office, get in at the colleges right for them and how to get the money they need to help pay the bill.
To receive Jean's weekly email newsletter and Jean's free CD: How To Find Cash For College, subscribe today at http://www.JeanKeller.com
Juliet questioned "What's in a name?" And when it comes to communicating with the colleges, you may think that as well. But, what if you're wrong?

Let's say you decide you like Costalotta University and decide to send them an email asking about their biochemistry program, for example. This is a great idea. So, you send that email and the person who receives your email at Costalotta U sees in their email inbox your email from Lax4Lyfe Or what if it's party4eva?

What if your email name makes you sound more like a slacker or a partier (which you're not) than a potential candidate (which you are) they want to have on their campus?
Maybe your email address is a childhood nickname or based on an inside joke, like 9andahalftoes? When it comes time to look over your file, do you really want the admissions folks to think of you as "cuddlybear"?

And what if your screen name could be considered offensive or just plain weird?
The solution? Create a "just for college" email address using your name or your first initial and last name - you get the idea. You can always forward the emails to your more personal email address that you can continue to use with friends or use a mail management program like Microsoft's Outlook or Apple's Mail to automatically check all of your email accounts.

Your "name only" email account might be boring, but it won't give colleges (or future employers) a bad first impression.

Another place to stay on top of when it comes to where you might make an impression is Facebook. They say a picture is worth a thousand words - but you might not ever get to say 10 words to even begin explaining some wacky photo that you or one of your friends posted to your wall. Colleges (and future employers) could check out your page (because you "liked" the college's page) to learn a little more about you than what is in your application.

If you said in your application that you love community service but on your Facebook page you posted a status saying you skipped out (again) on your scheduled time volunteering at the library, what do you think that might do to your application?

You only get one chance to make a first impression. Part of your Smart Plan For College should include some strategies to make sure that the impression you make with the colleges is a good one.
Your Smart Plan For College Assignment:

Take stock of all the places a college might get a "first impression" - your email address, your Facebook page, your Twitter account, Pinterest, Google + - wherever.

Give your online presence the "Grandma" test - if you wouldn't want your grandmother to see it, then you need to make some changes!

Then, change your email address, delete questionable photos or statements, block so-called friends who think it's hilarious to post dumb things on your wall - do whatever it takes to make sure your first impression is a good one. It is your name, after all.

Jeanmarie Keller has helped thousands of students get into colleges they love while making sure their parents save a fortune on the bill. Jeanmarie is the creator of the Smart Plan For College System which teaches her client-families how to get noticed in the admissions office, get in at the colleges right for them and how to get the money they need to help pay the bill. To receive Jean's weekly email newsletter and Jean's free CD: How To Find Cash For College, subscribe today at http://www.JeanKeller.com
   

Navigating Test Prep

students-studying

Careful preparation and studying will help you achieve a significantly higher score on both the SAT and the ACT, thereby increasing your chances of getting into your college of choice. But preparing for the SAT or ACT exam can be stressful. With the many options available for practice tests, preparation courses and tutoring, it may be difficult to decide which preparation pathway would be best for you. Here are some tips to help you navigate your preparation pathway:

Plan a schedule for studying.

If you organize when you’ll be studying for your upcoming exam, your time will be more productive. This approach is particularly important if you are involved in multiple activities inside and outside school. NextStepU recommends that you create a schedule for the next four to eight weeks and study a minimum of five days a week. Schedule study sessions during times that you will be alert (e.g. during the day rather than late at night), and schedule blocks of at least an hour. Plan what area of the test you will study during your sessions (focus on one area at a time), and choose an environment that will not be distracting. Eliminating background noises and setting a timer may also help you focus.

 

Take a prep course.

If you feel that you will not be focused enough on your own, many organizations offer prep courses both in person or online. Kaplan and Sylvan Learning are two well-known organizations that offer preparation classes with certified teachers, but it may be worth first asking your teachers and guidance counselors if your school offers classes for free.

 

Hire a private tutor.

If this is something you can afford, it is a great option for any kind of learner. Be careful with your selection of a tutor; aim for one who is well qualified. Kaplan also offers tutoring services, given by certified instructors. You may also want to opt for a tutor recommended by your school or through a reputable agency.

 

Get a prep book and practice.

This is a must for anyone preparing for an exam. The Princeton Review offers high quality preparation manuals, with test-taking tips and practice exams. Make sure that you take multiple mock exams to get a good feel for the test. Remember, practice makes perfect, so take a mock exam about once a week. College Board and the ACT also offer practice tests.

 

There is power in numbers.

Chances are, many of your friends are also preparing for the big test. Start a test-prep study group that meets once or twice a week. You can organize a schedule, review flashcards together and help keep each other focused. But remember: Avoid studying with friends you know will goof off!

 

Strategize.

Once you have decided on an action plan, have a little fun. Play Zero Hour Threat, an SAT and ACT prep video game. SparkNotes has ACT and SAT study guides, with free assessments of your skills. The site also has flashcards to help build your vocabulary in preparation for the exam. Get friends and family to help you study. You may be the one taking the test, but remember that everyone is rooting for you!

 

Melissa Woodson is the community manager for @WashULaw, a premier Masters of Law program offered through Washington University in St. Louis as well as a contributor to the LLM guide. In her spare time, she enjoys running, cooking, and making half-baked attempts at training her dog.

 

   

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