Radio Personality

Quick Facts: Announcers
2012 Median Pay $27,750 per year
$13.34 per hour
Entry-Level Education See How to Become One
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training See How to Become One
Number of Jobs, 2012 52,000
Job Outlook, 2012-22 2% (Little or no change)
Employment Change, 2012-22 800

What Announcers Do

Announcers present music, news, and sports and may provide commentary or interview guests about these topics or other important events. Some act as masters of ceremonies (emcees) or disc jockeys (DJs) at weddings, parties, or clubs.

Work Environment

Many announcers work in radio and television studios. Some announcers are self-employed; others work part time.

How to Become an Announcer

Educational requirements for announcers vary. Radio and television announcers typically have a bachelor’s degree in journalism, broadcasting, or communications, along with an internship or work experience from their college radio or television station. Public address system announcers typically need a high school diploma, along with short-term on-the-job training.

Pay

In May 2012, the median annual wage for radio and television announcers was $28,020. The median annual wage for public address system and other announcers was $26,230 in May 2012.

Job Outlook

Employment of announcers is projected to show little or no change from 2012 to 2022. Experienced, formally trained announcers should have the best job prospects.